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Photochemical noise reduction - apparently it's a real thing


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#1 Karim D. Ghantous

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 05:45 PM

A photographer explains it briefly:

 

https://iftimestoods...before-after-2/

 

So, has anyone done this with movie film? If so, was it worth it?


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#2 Mark Dunn

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 06:13 AM

Coming from a stills background all I can think of is that this will cause slight overdevelopment, a speed push and possibly increase the contrast a bit. Rodinal is a fine-grain developer, but I doubt that the effect would survive standard development.

It's a non-starter for MP film because it is continuously processed. It can't escape agitation.

This is just development, followed by, er, development.

BTW it's not "lack of fixation" which bleaches the silver image, it's the bleach stage. The clue is in the name. The only time an image is left unfixed is in reversal development, after bleach and before re-exposure.


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#3 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 08:39 PM

You can change the developer chemistry and strength to reduce grain, Brad has been doing some experiments with our Allen 35mm/16mm B&W machine to knock some grain down on XX22 and it seems to have worked, I can ask him what they changed tomorrow.


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#4 Chris Burke

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 05:38 AM

You can change the developer chemistry and strength to reduce grain, Brad has been doing some experiments with our Allen 35mm/16mm B&W machine to knock some grain down on XX22 and it seems to have worked, I can ask him what they changed tomorrow.

good to hear rob. Those interviews I told you I was going to shoot I will probably shoot B&W 7222.


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#5 Karim D. Ghantous

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 06:46 PM

Robert, that would be very helpful information. The photographer I cited uses 5222 in his film cameras.


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