Jump to content


Rear Projection


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 ChristianK

ChristianK
  • Guests

Posted 23 June 2005 - 04:57 PM

Big fan of old Elvis movies (the look more than the clever plots). Thinking of shooting a music video with this in mind.

My questions is, what are tips/problems one runs into with this. For example, is there a better frame rate to shoot at, filmstock, certain types of projectors? Certainly, there a many variables, but searches on google have turned up nothing for me.

I'm really not afraid flickers, as this will add to the plastic look of the piece, but would definitely like to know where to start so I can do tests. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Arri B/L 16mm
  • 0

#2 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19769 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 23 June 2005 - 06:24 PM

Traditional rear projection would be done at normal 24 fps rate, with the projector having a special single-bladed shutter (and very bright lamp) and the projector motor and camera being in sync. Usually you have to rent the whole rig from a company specializing in rear projection like Hansard. You need a lot of stage space because of the distance behind the screen that the projector has to be.

Since the shutter of the projector and the camera are in sync, the operator doesn't see any projected image on the screen in the viewfinder.

New techniques have involved digital projection, which doesn't have to be synced with the camera if it is an LCD projector, ideally HD resolution.

Even then, the RP screens are expensive. All of this is easier if you're only talking about small scale projection, like out a window or just behind a close-up. In fact, many old movies shot the wide shots on location and only the coverage in front of a RP screen.

Some recent movies like the Judy Garland TV movie with Judy Davis and "Down With Love" have faked a rear projection look with greenscreens, because it was easier to shoot and didn't need the stage space for projector throw.
  • 0

#3 Michael Most

Michael Most
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 765 posts
  • Other

Posted 23 June 2005 - 06:45 PM

My questions is, what are tips/problems one runs into with this. For example, is there a better frame rate to shoot at, filmstock, certain types of projectors? Certainly, there a many variables, but searches on google have turned up nothing for me.

I'm really not afraid flickers, as this will add to the plastic look of the piece, but would definitely like to know where to start so I can do tests. Any suggestions would be appreciated.


Most RP work today is done with video projectors, in part because it's easier (no degredation or gate bounce on repeated passes, no positive dirt to pick up during projection, no possibility of scratches, etc, etc.), and in part because flicker ceases to be an issue, even with interlaced sources (the reasonably long persistence of DLP projection takes care of that). Both "One Tree Hill" and "24" have done a number of their traveling car shots that way this past season. In both cases, the backgrounds were shot on video (a PAL PD150 for 24, an FX1 Sony for One Tree Hill).
  • 0

#4 ChristianK

ChristianK
  • Guests

Posted 23 June 2005 - 07:37 PM

Great info. That's exactly the feedback and base I needed.

Thanks guys.
  • 0


Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Visual Products

Abel Cine

The Slider

Technodolly

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

Opal

Visual Products

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC