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Success Rate On Jobs Landed?


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#1 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 29 April 2017 - 10:58 PM

I guess this would mainly go out to people in (or who were in) an un-established point of their careers. What percent of the time does a potential "yes" or "maybe" gig actually come through for you?

 

A discussion I had with someone last year said that only 10% of the time an opportunity actually falls through in the business of things. Wanted to see if that was pessimistic or optimistic.

 

Thanks.


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#2 Michael LaVoie

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 07:35 AM

A discussion I had with someone last year said that only 10% of the time an opportunity actually falls through in the business of things. Wanted to see if that was pessimistic or optimistic.

 

Thanks.

Are you saying that your discussion you had with someone said that 10% of the time opportunities for you both were successful? Meaning that 90% of potential jobs fell through in the negotiation?    Or the opposite.  Hard to tell what you meant based on how you wrote that.

 

If you're getting 90% of the gigs you go after, congrats.  That's awesome.  I wouldn't complain considering how flooded the labor market is and how wonky the rates have become.

 

If you only get 10% of the gigs you go after, I'd check whether you're quoting rates properly or doing something in the initial discussions that may put off a potential client.

 

Negotiations and initial talks are where you see all the red flags of who you do and don't want to work with.  And vice versa.  Sometimes, it's you who's dodging bullets.  You can see those clearer with more experience.


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#3 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 08:00 AM

Sorry, should've said "comes through". It's not so much negotiation as it is clients losing interest or just calling it off for whatever nervous reason.


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#4 Michael LaVoie

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 01:12 PM

Define clients.   If you're talking about companies that are not involved in media production at all but want videos done, you need to find out their experience with contracting out that sort of work.

 

That should be the first question you ask a potential non industry customer.  If they've never done a video with a company ever?  Run.  

 

It's rare that I would ever take on a brand or startup directly as a client. There's almost always an agency or media production company that's booking me.

 

I have had more than a few interactions with startups and businesses who wanted me to do everything and act as a full production company for social media videos, commercials and other projects.

 

Most would not be forthcoming with their budgets ever and would never clearly define their goals. Not so much as a comparable youtube clip to let me know what they're aiming for.  So yeah, almost always these discussions died early on.  I don't ever regret anything as I've never lost an opportunity as much as I've just saved myself a ton of hassle.

 

You have to really have a great deal of patience to tolerate a brand or company that's new to this.  Most believe they're wasting their money hiring a professional and are totally convinced they should have their nephew come in with an Iphone and call it a day.

 

If I have your question wrong and you're actually dealing with experienced production companies and agencies that are blowing you off consistently, that's likely a professional or personal issue and I couldn't really speak to that point unless you describe a certain situation.


Edited by Michael LaVoie, 30 April 2017 - 01:12 PM.

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#5 aapo lettinen

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 02:26 PM

There is a substantial difference between "yes" and "maybe" gigs.
A great amount of the maybe gigs are not serious job offers, the more like want to compare prices and then choose from these options later if the order establishes.
I would say it could be something like 10% of the maybe gigs and about 30 to 60% of the yes gigs will realize in the end
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#6 Jan Tore Soerensen

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 04:17 PM

I guess this would mainly go out to people in (or who were in) an un-established point of their careers. What percent of the time does a potential "yes" or "maybe" gig actually come through for you?

 

A discussion I had with someone last year said that only 10% of the time an opportunity actually falls through in the business of things. Wanted to see if that was pessimistic or optimistic.

 

Thanks.

I concider myself above average on sales, and there will be many no's before a yes. It's about chosing your battles, going for the right type of client, and valuing a relationship over short term money.

 

For me, it's about meeting new people, which can come through cold-calls or referrals that turn into meetings. This turns into you listening to their problems and figuring out their needs, and from there, pitching them an idea at a certain price. If the price is too low, they won't take you seriously. Too high? You won't get the job. Over time, if you and we do good work, and hopefully stumble upon genius at some point, recognition and reputation will come.

 

Most of the work we have done so far, has come through people I met at some point, or from previous spec work.

 

And for clarification, we mostly produce video-content and marketing for businesses on Facebook, and the occational cinema ad.  


Edited by Jan Tore Soerensen, 23 May 2017 - 04:17 PM.

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#7 M Joel W

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 03:08 AM

This is a complicated question. At the very low end you may find clients walking all over you with impunity and it's a disaster when the work falls through or they refuse to pay. On the very high end (where you're marking $50k/day as a commercial director) you can expect fierce competition and maybe only book a few gigs a year there despite pitching aggressively, which sounds even worse, but a few gigs still pays a healthy living wage. 

 

It's a complicated question. If you undercharge you'll find more work but it pays less. If you overcharge you'll find less but it pays more. In theory? 

 

It's a complicated question. I wouldn't take anything at face value. I wouldn't make decisions based on the biases of others, either. 


Edited by M Joel W, 21 June 2017 - 03:10 AM.

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