Jump to content


Photo

Rail System For Sony FS7


  • Please log in to reply
1 reply to this topic

#1 Don Lomonaco

Don Lomonaco

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Other
  • Grand Rapids, MI

Posted 02 May 2017 - 12:43 PM

Hi all!  We have a Sony FS7 and we've begun to explore different lenses than the 28-135mm that came with our kit.  We use a Sachtler FSB8 head and the stock baseplate.  We'd like to try some Canon glass such as the 70-200mm and the 200-400mm, as well as other manufactures of long zooms.  To do this we need some additional lens supports that can reach variable heights above the rails since our camera and the stock lens collars for each lens are at two different heights.  Can you recommend to me some systems that would accomplish this that can be attached to our standard baseplate?  At this point, we've no plans to use the camera as a shoulder mount if that helps to narrow down recommendations.  Another accessory we use is a 4" monitor on an articulating arm that will also be attached to a rail.


  • 0

#2 Michael LaVoie

Michael LaVoie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 714 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 02 May 2017 - 04:13 PM

They're all pretty awful actually.   The extremely small surface area of the bottom of the FS7 due to it's inner curve, the lack of any rubber on the bottom of the camera or the face of many of the plates out there makes it very hard to secure it  without any play. When you add the torque of the handle to the face of the camera and the length of the front and back ends which have no support you have three forces in three directions trying to spin the camera away from the plate under it.

 

I remember being at Abel Cinetech when I bought mine and me and Matt tried out every single baseplate they had scratching our heads as to why nothing would actually hold the camera securely.  Even with two screws in place.  

 

Chrosziel might have the best one out there.  But I still had to modify mine with a rubber pad  to actually keep the camera from slipping left and right slightly.  The pad was placed on the area that's curved because there's a gap between the camera and the Chrosziel plate in that area.

 

Now it's rock solid and doesn't move.  But I always secure the handle to the chrosziel pad.  Not the camera as that makes it more likely to spin the camera off the baseplate.


Edited by Michael LaVoie, 02 May 2017 - 04:17 PM.

  • 0


FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Visual Products

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

CineTape

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

The Slider