Jump to content



Photo

Two camera setup


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Rich Hibner

Rich Hibner
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 121 posts
  • Other

Posted 06 May 2017 - 03:22 PM

I have a quick question re: two cam setup. I have two black magic micros with sporting a speedbooster and a Sigma 18-35 and the other with a regular nikon mount and a Sigma 50-100. When shooting, which would you suggest: Having two cams on the same side capturing one actor - a mid and cu, or have the each cam setup on opposites to get both actors at the same time - a close up on one and a mid on the other? 

 

How would you go about doing it? Any suggestions? 


  • 0

#2 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 6965 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 06 May 2017 - 11:09 PM

I tend to like both on one side and the longer lens camera closer to the eye-line. But it depends on the space, i've crossed lenses before of course as well.


  • 0

#3 Satsuki Murashige

Satsuki Murashige
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3436 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 07 May 2017 - 01:18 AM

I think it depends on the circumstances.

Do Medium/CU on the same actor if you're trying to maximize continuity between shots or if you only have the actor for a limited time and need to finish as much of their coverage as possible.

For example, if you have one expensive actor in the cast and need to shoot them out as fast as possible. Or if you have a complicated gag that requires a lot of reset time like blood spatter or wardrobe/makeup changes. It saves time to grab two shots on the shot list at once. This is usually easier for lighting and camera, but worse for sound since they would usually like to get their boom mic closer for a CU, but you will see it in the Medium.

Do opposing shots if you need to capture both actors' performances as they riff off of each other or improvise. Or if there are ego issues with one actor getting their coverage first. Think of the diner scene in 'Heat' with Robert DeNiro and Al Pacino on-screen together for the first time. It makes sense to shoot both angles simultaneously. This is usually more limiting for camera and lighting, but easier on sound (as long as there are multiple boom operators).
  • 0

#4 David Peterson

David Peterson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 157 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Auckland, New Zealand.

Posted 11 May 2017 - 11:29 AM

Be careful with how you do multi cam shoots.... unless you want your soundie to murder you in your sleep! ;-) 


  • 0


Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

The Slider

Technodolly

ZoomCrane

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Visual Products

CineLab

Quantum Music Works

Pro 8mm

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Pro 8mm

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Visual Products

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Quantum Music Works

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

ZoomCrane

rebotnix Technologies