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"Alien: Covenant" cinematography/image question


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#1 Jesse Straub

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 01:20 AM

Hello. I watched Alien: Covenant at the Udvar Hazy IMAX theater which has an absolutely mind-bogglingly enormous screen, and I noticed that, while extremely clear/good quality, the image suffered from something that looked similar to edge haloes. 

I know A:C was an Arri Alexa XT project at (I think) 4k, so it looked excellent even on that mega-huge screen, but I've seen 70mm projections at the same theater and they look even a bit better (of course).

 

The phenomenon i'm talking about with the edge halo-ish things are, perhaps not surprisingly, not visible on a home sized screen or even a regular theater.

They don't appear... necessary to the image and I just wonder why they appear.

 

It's interesting because I thought the phenomenon was a byproduct of really early digital that they had fixed, because I have a book called Star Wars: Frames that has very high quality images from all six films sourced from the masters, and Attack of The Clones (shot with the F900) has these edge halo type things if you look closely at the page, but Revenge of The Sith (shot on the F950) does not suffer from this issue, leading me to believe it was a digital camera issue fixed by 2005.

 

OR it was just sharpening applied to the DCP in the case of A:C, which begs the question- why? It certainly doesn't improve the image.

 

Also if anyone has info on what files are sent to real IMAX theaters that'd be fun to know (as in, regular DCPs, or some kind of special bigger/better file?).

 

P.S.

Alien: Covenant was pretty good and looked amazing. But then again I liked Prometheus.


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#2 Manu Delpech

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 04:38 AM

There's an article in the next AC next month, so maybe there'll be some explanation. Didn't notice anything in a regular screening, I never saw Exodus but the trailer clearly has some edge enhancement to it, which I thought was odd, and that was Red Epic, and Darius Wolski too.

 

Maybe it's the IMAX DMR process that gives you that impression? 


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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 08:16 AM

An interview with Ridley Scott's colorist around the time of "Robin Hood" said he liked to sharpen parts of the frame to make things stand out more, to draw the eye.
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#4 Jesse Straub

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 03:45 PM

An interview with Ridley Scott's colorist around the time of "Robin Hood" said he liked to sharpen parts of the frame to make things stand out more, to draw the eye.

I'm sure that's it. I just find it odd, since sharpening never really looks better than without it IMO.

There's an article in the next AC next month, so maybe there'll be some explanation. Didn't notice anything in a regular screening, I never saw Exodus but the trailer clearly has some edge enhancement to it, which I thought was odd, and that was Red Epic, and Darius Wolski too.

 

Maybe it's the IMAX DMR process that gives you that impression? 

What exactly is the IMAX DMR process for digital? Is that just the thing where they layer two images together?


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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 09:46 PM

No, you're thinking of digital IMAX projection which used two 2K projectors to create 4K (not sure if they just use regular 4K projectors now.)

IMAX DMR was a blow up process involving things like reducing grain or noise and then sharpening; the process for digital movies being shown in digital IMAX is similar.
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#6 charles g clark

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 05:17 PM

According to the a c article the di was completed on 2132 x 1374 exr files for a final resolution of 2048 x 858, so a 2k finish
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