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Filming A TV Screen


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#1 Cody Muller

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 05:21 AM

Hi there,

 

I'm prepping a scene that quite heavily features a TV showing some footage.  

The TV will probably be seen in every shot of the scene. (Either in the background or foreground.)

 

Our tests show one visual flaw we would like to avoid. Each frame of the TV footage has what we call the "in between 2 frames" effect. (The 2 attached screenshots you'll see what I mean.)

 

Do you think there is a way to avoid this that does not involve inserting the footage in post?

 

If it were possible to do it for real, It would save us some money. Bu shooting it for real also allows us to play with things like reflections on the TV screen and do more complex camera moves.

 

What are you experiences regarding shooting screens? 

 

Thanks!

 

 

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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 06:44 AM

Is it interlaced or progressive footage on the screen and which frame rate are you shooting at?


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#3 Dan Hasson

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 07:46 AM

I've prefer playing something on the screen thats in black & white.

This works as long as you're not showing what's on the screen. 

 

Also if you're using lights to replicate the light coming off a TV screen, then don't have it flicker like a lot of people do. This may just be me but I find that if I'm watching TV, the light does not flicker. Unless of course you want the flickering light for one reason or another. But realistically I don't think TV's do this.


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#4 Arthur Sanchez

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 08:09 AM

I assume you are shooting film...

Have you tried a more narrow shutter ... Adjusting the shutter speed.

Also, matching the frame rate of the TV footage to the frame rate be shot.

 

that's my experience with shooting a CRT or a TV set and not have rolling or other artifacts.

 

Arthur!


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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 10:27 AM

We need a lot more info...
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#6 Cody Muller

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 03:18 PM

Thanks for help so far!

 

Some more info:

- We're shooting 24fps. And the footage on the screen is 24fps.

- The screen we shot the test footage on a iMac screen. (It was a very barebones test.)

We don't have an actual TV screen set for the shoot, so i'd like to get one that works best for this sort of shoots.

-The footage shown will actually be in B&W

-The camera we used in the test was an iPhone actually. (With the app Filmic Pro which allows you to control shutter speed and fps)

Again, the camera for the shoot is not set in stone yet, we're still in development phase.

-What is shown on TV is basically as important as what is happening to the people watching. Which is why I'm really trying to get acquainted with shooting screens.

 

It is possible though, that I did not set up the shutter speed of camera correctly. I'll do some further tests with different settings.

 

Is there any other info that you might need?


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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 03:55 PM

Does your iPhone shoot at 24 fps? You might want to retest with a DSLR that does 24.
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#8 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 08:09 PM

  I think you might be better off with a camera that has a "continuous " or "variable " shutter function.. you can then dial out by eye in the field very quickly and easily. any flicker or roll bar weirdness .. even very cheap cameras have this ability now..  but make sure it doesn't effect any other lights you are using or in frame.. esp practical fluorescents .. for flicker..  


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#9 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 01:49 AM

Just be aware that phones usually have a variable frame rate, Film Pro is one way around it (although I'm not sure if it totally removes it and runs at a precisely constant frame rate).


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