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tungsten, 85 and 81ef


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#1 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 26 June 2005 - 03:36 PM

I suddenly noticed how much filter glass I was using on a day shoot.

So I was using 5218 stock outside - so rating at 320 with an 85 - then to create a bit of warmth I was adding an 81ef

Then I was thinking I am adding two filters when I could use one... which filter would I add and would I still rate the 5218 stock at 320?

thanks

Rolfe
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#2 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 26 June 2005 - 05:50 PM

Well, an 85 and a 81EF would add up to 1 1/3 stop compensation, so you should really be rating 5218 at 200asa, unless you are underexposing.

if you just want to lose some glass in front of the lens, I would try a heavy coral flter. Coral 5 is usually the equivalent of an 85 (depending on manufacturer) so you could try a Coral 7 or 8 according to taste.
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#3 Mike Williamson

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Posted 27 June 2005 - 08:19 AM

If you want to reduce your filters, why not shoot a 250D stock outside? On the last project I shot, I went with Fuji 250D for exteriors and day interiors (rather than the Eterna 500T which I used for the rest of the film) because I wanted to use an 81EF and I didn't like the idea of having to stack a ton of filters over the lens. So even though there wasn't much difference in grain between the two stocks, I went daylight balanced for exactly the reason that's bothering you.

With the 81EF on, 250D should be rated at 160 however. If you really need more speed, you could try the Reala500D, that's about the only stock that would be 320 and true daylight balance with an 81EF on it.
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#4 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 27 June 2005 - 05:20 PM

I should have been clearer with my question. I am using 2 filters to effectively reduce the blue in the scene - could I use just one and if so which one

So an 85 plus a 81ef would equal?

thanks

Rolfe
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#5 Mike Williamson

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Posted 27 June 2005 - 05:56 PM

So an 85 plus a 81ef would equal?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I think that would be a filter you'd have to have custom made, I don't know of anything that would combine the effect of those two exact filters into one.

Seriously though, if you're trying to reduce the blue in the scene, why shoot tungsten film outside?

On a related topic, I posted something about warming filters awhile ago that got some interesting responses, I'll put the link below. I remember Tony Brown had a cool idea about using a Tobacco instead of an 85 as correction when shooting tungsten outdoors.
link
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#6 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 28 June 2005 - 04:24 PM

So an 85 plus a 81ef would equal?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



An 85 filter has a Mired shift of 112. An 81EF a mired shift of 52. Any warming filter with a similar shift (164) will have a similar effect, although Straw, Coral, Tobacco etc have their own individual qualities.

It's all a matter of taste.
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#7 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 28 June 2005 - 10:19 PM

A Wratten 85B converts 5500K to 3200K, with a mired value of 131. With the latitude of color negative film, you can easily go the rest of the way to your warmer look during the color timing/grading.
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#8 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 29 June 2005 - 03:43 AM

thanks for the help

Rolfe
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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 June 2005 - 01:12 AM

Why not shoot the gray scale with the 81EF filter and then switch to the 85 filter for the scene? The negative itself would be neutral but the dailies would look warm. Or shoot the gray scale with one level of Coral and then the scene with a higher number of Coral.
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