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Stabilisation for inconsistent film frame lines?


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#1 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 10:06 PM

I'm planning to do a DIY transfer of a short segment of a super 8 film for a family event coming up very soon. It's one shot on the reel that's probably less than 200 frames - shot 24fps. Call me crazy but I'll be advancing the film manually frame by frame. There will not be any automation at all. I'll rig up a crude but basic film transport system with a backlight behind it. And I'll use my tripod-mounted Panasonic G6 Micro 4/3 camera to photograph each individual film frame with a Canon FD 50mm macro lens and extension tube.

 

Though I'm wondering about image stabilisation. Since I'll be advancing the film manually, each frame will probably be in a slightly different position. I'm going to try my best to line up the frame lines with lines in the camera's viewfinder but it's unlikely to be a perfect match every time. It's inevitable that in the transferred footage, the frame line will be jumping a bit. Not only that but the film footage is hand held so there is a little bit of camera movement but it's fairly acceptable / non-objectionable.

 

I'm going to use some kind of image stabilisation like VirtualDub's deshaker plugin after assembling the stills into a video file. However, what I want is the software to stabilise only the frame lines and ignore my hand held camera movement within the frames. I think that's going to be tricky unless I can find some software that can distinguish between the two types of movement. Any suggestions on software that is intelligent enough to make that distinction?


Edited by Patrick Cooper, 13 June 2017 - 10:08 PM.

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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 08:00 AM

After Effects, or anything with a point tracker, could do this. You tell it what part of the image to look at, and you'd probably choose the corner of the frame. Make sure you includet the edge of the frame in your scan. This may fail if there's very little contrast between the corner of frame and a very dark picture, in which case you can switch to tracking another corner.
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#3 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 08:31 AM

After Effects, or anything with a point tracker, could do this. You tell it what part of the image to look at, and you'd probably choose the corner of the frame. Make sure you includet the edge of the frame in your scan. 

 

Oh yea I'll definitely include the edge of the frame in the scan. I'll probably also include the perforation as well. I admit Ive never used After Effects. I guess I could download a trial version. Would you know of any other NLE programs that have a point tracker? 


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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 09:15 AM

Most visual effects systems would have one. You may find there's a way to do it from Virtualdubm, or something, too.

 

P


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