Jump to content


Photo

Techniques for filming on a moving bus?

stablazation handheld

  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 Chris Lange

Chris Lange
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 56 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Minneapolis, MN

Posted 24 June 2017 - 08:07 PM

I would like to film inside a moving bus (small bus, driving on smooth streets) with a Red Epic and achieve fairly-stable shots (not bumpy or jerky).

 

I will test handheld and a tripod.  I'm actually okay with smooth handheld feel if I can pull that off.  I might try strapping the camera to sandbags or beanbags, to seats or dashboard.  

 

I have not used a Movi - would that be worth testing in this scenario?

 

Do you have any camera operation or technology recommendations for this?

 

Thank you,

Chris

 

 

 

 

 


  • 0


#2 Frank Hegyi

Frank Hegyi
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 28 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Boston

Posted 24 June 2017 - 10:02 PM

I wouldn't spend money on a movi if I were you. In a confined space like that, the tripod can go anywhere a gimbal would go. I would try weighting down the tripod with a sandbag.


  • 0

#3 Robin R Probyn

Robin R Probyn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1681 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Tokyo

Posted 24 June 2017 - 11:53 PM

What part of the Bus.. there usually isnt room for a tripod anyway.. maybe in the front area.. if you can take seats out also maybe.. but all the bumps will just go straight through the legs to the camera.. at least handheld your body will absorb some .. I would try an easy rig just to alleviate fatigue ..   depends what look you want too I guess.. HH or not.. 


  • 0

#4 Chris Lange

Chris Lange
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 56 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Minneapolis, MN

Posted 25 June 2017 - 08:47 PM

I will have shots all over the bus.  Easy rig might serve me well too.  Thanks.


  • 0

#5 Robin R Probyn

Robin R Probyn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1681 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Tokyo

Posted 25 June 2017 - 11:20 PM

I will have shots all over the bus.  Easy rig might serve me well too.  Thanks.

 

 

Should be ok for sitting level shots.. standing you might hit the roof of the bus.. not sure your budget but on a film like United 93 they had a rail set up along the middle of the plane (set) and had a sort of bungie cable sliding rig.. this might work if you have the time to rig it/take seats out.. etc..


  • 0

#6 Chris Lange

Chris Lange
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 56 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Minneapolis, MN

Posted 26 June 2017 - 08:19 AM

That's an interesting concept.  Thanks for sharing.  Not sure if we need it that elaborate, though I definitely see the merits of that kind of rigging.


  • 0

#7 Robin R Probyn

Robin R Probyn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1681 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Tokyo

Posted 26 June 2017 - 08:55 AM

well I guess buses usually have rails or straps or something for standing passengers .. it you dont need "dolly" shots maybe some sort of bungie rig from these..? .. but there again if your sitting then an easy rig is probably just easier :)..


  • 0

#8 Michael LaVoie

Michael LaVoie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 710 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 26 June 2017 - 05:21 PM

A lot of city busses are more like subways in the rear third of the bus.  With seats that face to the side rather than the front which is more of a Peter Pan/Greyhound type setup.

 

So depending on the script, I'd go for that setup if you have a choice. Cause you can shoot coverage on sticks with a lot more freedom and you won't have to worry about filling the bus with a ton of extras.  


  • 0

#9 Sabyasachi Patra

Sabyasachi Patra
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 72 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • New Delhi/ Banglaore, India

Posted 20 July 2017 - 06:02 AM

The tripod should give lot of vibrations. Something like an easy rig or similar variants will be better. Even completely handheld with just a barebones camera and lens would help.


  • 0

#10 Chris Lange

Chris Lange
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 56 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Minneapolis, MN

Posted 20 July 2017 - 08:06 AM

Thanks, I think I'll go with the easy rig first. 


  • 0

#11 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7058 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 20 July 2017 - 03:54 PM

did a steady-cam for this nintendo commercial;

 

https://youtu.be/wTPT8_8pzeQ?t=61

 

 

camera was an Alexa Mini (similar in size to red) with Ultra Primes.


  • 0

#12 Gregg MacPherson

Gregg MacPherson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1793 posts
  • Other
  • New Zealand

Posted 20 July 2017 - 05:13 PM

Adrian,

That was a really sweet commercial..! The only flaw is that the dog didn't get to dance.  Then again,  if it had....Actually,  as is,  with just the idea of the dog wanting to join in,  was bang on..


  • 0



FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Visual Products

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Glidecam

The Slider