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Lighting A pool/Pool Light


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#1 Jaden Scholes

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 12:27 PM

Hello beautiful people, 

 

I'm currently prepping a feature for August and a portion of the film is set around a pool at night so we were thinking it would be great to have light coming from the pool, but the problem is that there is no pool light installed. 

 

I've never played with underwater lights or installed a pool light so was hoping someone out there would be willing to let me know how it could be done. They key here is not to have the scene light by the pool but just to have something so it's not a dark mess. Something that can be done quickly and safely. 

 

I was thinking some simple I could put onto the bottom the pool or even a consumer rate pool light that is simple to install but has a decent output. 

 

Thanks in advance! 

 


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#2 JD Hartman

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 04:12 PM

You can rent Hydroflex fixtures which are waterproof Par64's.  Use silly floating candles if you wish....  Perhaps some artfully designed floating islands with concealed fixtures (powered from GFI circuits of course).


Edited by JD Hartman, 11 July 2017 - 04:16 PM.

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#3 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 03:13 PM

Depending on your time and inclination:

 

Years ago I made some great little underwater lights using 40mm pipe couplers. Other than the coupler, each light required two 50mm circles of plexiglass, the MR16 and its holder, and one waterproof cable gland. It doesn't get much simpler than that, and these days you would use LED MR16s.

 

You would need a lot of them to light a pool, I suppose, though no worse than the candles.

 

One advantage of this is that it's 12V powered, which is safe in the wet.

 

P


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#4 JD Hartman

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 07:09 PM

Depending on your time and inclination:

 

Years ago I made some great little underwater lights using 40mm pipe couplers. Other than the coupler, each light required two 50mm circles of plexiglass, the MR16 and its holder, and one waterproof cable gland. It doesn't get much simpler than that, and these days you would use LED MR16s.

 

You would need a lot of them to light a pool, I suppose, though no worse than the candles.

 

One advantage of this is that it's 12V powered, which is safe in the wet.

 

P

 

It's not the voltage that kills you, it's the current.


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#5 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 07:41 PM

You're contending that 12V is somehow going to be dangerous to humans?


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#6 JD Hartman

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 05:28 AM

No, I'm contending that enough current at 12VAC will kill you just as easily as the same current at 480VAC.

 https://www.physics....al_current.html

 

DIY: flags, frames, grip gear, etc, not underwater lights.


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#7 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 05:46 AM

Well, yes, but given V=IR and the high R of your body, you'd struggle to get 12V to push enough current to cause a problem, which is why we can't generally even feel less than several tens of volts and we don't bother insulating low voltages against touch.

 

Hang on, let me stick my fingers across this 14.4V camera battery.

 

Yep, still alive. 

 

P


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#8 Mark Dunn

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 05:50 AM

No, I'm contending that enough current at 12VAC will kill you just as easily as the same current at 480VAC.

 https://www.physics....al_current.html

 

DIY: flags, frames, grip gear, etc, not underwater lights.

Phil is referring to DC, which is supposed to be inherently safer than AC, but anyway, as he says, 12V won't drive enough current. That article is really talking about domestic voltage, although that reference to 42V is one to take note of.


Edited by Mark Dunn, 13 July 2017 - 05:55 AM.

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#9 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 06:03 AM

I have servants hold glow worms in jam jars in my pool .. its very safe and effective.. 


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#10 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 10:33 AM

When I used to operate a followspot for stage shows, when I was about fifteen, the crew would be called to report in before the performance and we'd commonly describe how we'd "goaded the glow-worms into a mating frenzy."


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#11 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 07:06 PM

And you tell that to youngsters these days..  .. 


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#12 JD Hartman

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 10:47 AM

Well, yes, but given V=IR and the high R of your body, you'd struggle to get 12V to push enough current to cause a problem, which is why we can't generally even feel less than several tens of volts and we don't bother insulating low voltages against touch.

 

Hang on, let me stick my fingers across this 14.4V camera battery.

 

Yep, still alive. 

 

P

 

Okay, were talking a pool here, so immerse your hands in water, go outside, throw up the bonnet on your car and grasp the battery terminals.  Should be okay, it's only 12VDC.  

People can and do get electrocuted by auto batteries, lucky ones survive with severe burns.  Have the ambulance crew take and post pictures, should you be unable.


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#13 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 03:22 PM

We should separate arc flash injury from shorting out an electrical device that's capable of high current, with the potential electrical injury. Under normal circumstances, a low voltage source such as a car battery will not provoke enough current to feel, although you're partially right: people stick their tongues across 9V battery terminals as a sort of very rough test, and you can just about feel that, because your tongue is wet.

 

It's worth being clear that something like a lead-acid battery can certainly produce burn injuries from resistive heating or from the acid inside, which can boil or electrolyse to hydrogen, and explode. People wearing metal jewellery or using wrenches to tighten battery terminal clamps have been injured. I'd believe that lead-acid battery explosions, which usually only happen when the battery has been very severely mistreated and can create high velocity lead shrapnel, have killed people. Nickel cadmium and lithium ion batteries are capable of very high currents which may start fires and these are genuine hazards.

 

In terms of sheer electrocution risk, not that I've ever heard of. You can feel it, 24V systems are a little more feelable, and I wouldn't go out of my way to get wet and grab wiring, but I've never even heard of it seriously damaging anyone. In terms of our pool lighting scenario, low voltage is orders of magnitude safer than mains.

 

P


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#14 JD Hartman

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 04:08 PM

I wouldn't be advocating DIY submersible lights of any voltage on a public forum.  For the same sort of reasons, any discussion of electrical tie-in is banned on Control Booth dot com.  Not just tie-ins with Trico clips, any sort of tie-in other than with camloks and a house bull switch is forbidden.


Edited by JD Hartman, 16 July 2017 - 04:10 PM.

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