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Editing super 16mm pre digital age


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#1 Steven Budden

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Posted 28 June 2005 - 12:14 AM

I'm curious about how super 16mm was edited before digital was the predominant method? I suppose something like a Moviola, if it were 16/35mm, could be used to do super 16mm? And then the film could be synched up with the 16mm full coat and when turning everything in for conforming, it could just be transferred to 35mm with optical sound? And then further editing could be done if needed I suppose?

Is this how it was done?

Thanks!

Steven
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#2 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 28 June 2005 - 01:05 AM

Most of it was done on a flatbed table like a Steenbeck, with the sound transfered to 16mm SEPMAG.

In a way this kind of editing was much superior to the then current linear video editing. You could extract a scene from anywhere in the film and move it, or shorten or lengthen it, it was already some form of non-linear editing but without the instant access that we are used to now.

The negative was conformed on a synchronizer with the edgenumbers as a guide (machine readable keykode numbers were not yet invented). From the cut negative a blow-up was made (direct or via IP/DN).

Some film schools still teach this editing method and I think it is valuable to have had physical contact with pieces of film at least once in a carreer before jumping into cyberediting.
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#3 Steven Budden

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Posted 30 June 2005 - 12:31 AM

Most of it was done on a flatbed table like a Steenbeck, with the sound transfered to 16mm SEPMAG.

In a way this kind of editing was much superior to the then current linear video editing. You could extract a scene from anywhere in the film and move it, or shorten or lengthen it, it  was already some form of non-linear editing but without the instant access that we are used to now.

The negative was conformed on a synchronizer with the edgenumbers as a guide (machine readable keykode numbers were not yet invented). From the cut negative a blow-up was made (direct or via IP/DN).

Some film schools still teach this editing method and I think it is valuable to have had physical contact with pieces of film at least once in a carreer before jumping into cyberediting.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


So the 16mm steenbeck can be used for super 16mm... is the viewer converted somehow?

Also, I suppose they used super 16mm projectors to check for focus and such when they got the film back from the lab? How does one make one of these super 16 projectors?

Thanks!

Steven
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 June 2005 - 12:33 AM

Some people just file out the projector gate.

As for editing, some people just cut with a regular 16mm viewer, not seeing the edge of picture, and would check things by projecting the footage. Some people got a Super-16 gate for the editing machine.
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#5 Alain LeTourneau

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Posted 01 July 2005 - 11:38 PM

So the 16mm steenbeck can be used for super 16mm... is the viewer converted somehow?

Also, I suppose they used super 16mm projectors to check for focus and such when they got the film back from the lab? How does one make one of these super 16 projectors?

Thanks!

Steven

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Steven,

Steenbeck and KEM both made Super 16 models (which is really just a different pix head made to accomodate the wider edge of the film).

Paul Tomasko sells a cheap kit to convert the pix head on a Std 16 Steenbeck (ST-900, ST-1200, etc). If you're interested I can give you contact info.

Also consider the projector, which needs to be converted. Eiki SSL is not too difficult (so I've heard), but have never tried it myself.


Alain
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