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2k Telecine Recommendations


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#1 filmmaker999

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Posted 29 June 2005 - 12:40 AM

I'm looking for a quality 2k telecine at the best possible price without sacrificing quality. Could I get some recommendations and rates from individuals that have actual experience in telecining and what my best options are in L.A. or outside L.A. from a quality lab?

Thanks.
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#2 Michael Most

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Posted 29 June 2005 - 01:27 AM

I'm looking for a quality 2k telecine at the best possible price without sacrificing quality.  Could I get some recommendations and rates from individuals that have actual experience in telecining and what my best options are in L.A. or outside L.A. from a quality lab?


There is no such thing as a 2K telecine because there is no such thing as a 2K video format, and telecine, by definition, is a video device. Now that that's clear, scanning can be done in multiple resolutions, and one such device to do this is the Spirit Datacine, which comes in a 2K version - however, 2K images can only be recorded on non-video formats, such as a frame sequence (Cineon, DPX, even TIFF). Either you want to do HD telecine (that is not 2K, it is HD resolution and color, 1920x1080) or you want to do 2K scanning. You need to be clearer as to which, and for what purposes (i.e., what you need to wind up with). I can give you recommendations, but it is unethical and presumptuous to quote facility rates on a public forum. You should contact the facilities for that information.
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 29 June 2005 - 05:43 AM

Kodak has an on-line directory of transfer facilities:

http://www.kodak.com...=0.1.4.15&lc=en

As Michael said, know what you want, and then get on the phone. :)
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#4 filmmaker999

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Posted 29 June 2005 - 01:12 PM

Thanks for the language lesson. I'm looking for a 2K SCAN, Cineon or DPX format, output directly to drives for a DI being done on a Final Touch system.

If you don't feel ethically comfortable giving prices, maybe someone could recommend a lab that uses a quality scanner and offers discounts for non-studio projects.

Thanks.
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#5 Michael Most

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Posted 29 June 2005 - 08:21 PM

Thanks for the language lesson.  I'm looking for a 2K SCAN, Cineon or DPX format, output directly to drives for a DI being done on a Final Touch system.

If you don't feel ethically comfortable giving prices, maybe someone could recommend a lab that uses a quality scanner and offers discounts for non-studio projects.


Scans have to be recorded on drives, or some kind of streaming data tape format or an optical disk, because they're not video - ergo, they can't be recorded on videotape. If you're color correcting on a system running Final Touch, you need to make sure that you're going to a "full blown," 2K capable system, not the HD version. That version only works with Quicktime files, which you could conceivably convert to, but you will lose most of the value of scanning rather than telecine-ing in the first place.

I'm not sure what you mean by a "non-studio" project. Is this a student film? A personal project? A no-budget, largely do-it-yourself affair? What qualifies a project for a discount at a lab is usually student status or the promise of more work, not simply the lack of available funds. In any case, I would recommend calling FotoKem in Burbank. They do a lot of student work, as well as a lot of independent work, have a reasonable rate card, and a lot of good equipment and expertise. You might also check out IO Film, in North Hollywood. They do a lot of student and independent work as well, and are quite a bit smaller and potentially a bit more personal than a lab like Fotokem. Matchframe (Burbank, althought the DI part of the company is in Glendale) would be another possibility.
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 29 June 2005 - 08:30 PM

I'm always amused by the questions containing the phrase "I want the best and cheapest..." in various incarnations. What's acceptable quality and acceptable pricing are highly subjective.
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#7 tylerhawes

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Posted 02 August 2005 - 09:21 PM

If budget is of paramount concern, have you considered doing a high-quality wide dynamic range HD-RGB telecine and finishing in that space? I advise a true 2K scan when budget allows, but the truth is very good results can be had with HD telecine at a fraction of the price. I prefer not to post arbitrary pricing in a public forum (especially when there are many variables), but would be interested in knowing more about your project.

What is the genre of the program and its running time? Have you already shot or are you in budgeting stage? How have/will you edit it? What about dailies? What stock? 35mm, 3-perf, Super 16? Where are you going with this? Is there any potential commercial future or is this exclusively a personal project for experiment / art / etc.?

Perhaps this is more than you want to tell, but it is what really interests me. We don't ever do just scanning for a film, but you might find a complete DI service offering may be more cost effective than you think...

We coincidentally do use FinalTouch 2K in-house working on a Barco DP100 2k DLP Cinema projector with 20-ft. screen in our 38-seat THX theater. We have 35mm film projector for dailies and/or side-by-side comparison of the finished print with digital master.

If you're determined to work on your own I'd still be interested in knowing more about the film and helping however I can.
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#8 Sam Wells

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Posted 03 August 2005 - 09:32 AM

If budget is of paramount concern, have you considered doing a high-quality wide dynamic range HD-RGB telecine and finishing in that space? I advise a true 2K scan when budget allows, but the truth is very good results can be had with HD telecine at a fraction of the price.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Hi Tyler, I didn't find any reference to doing the scanning or telecine on your website.

Does one get a flat grade elsewhere & then bring files or tape to your facility ? Or do you guys do the film transfers - i.e. did I miss something ?

Thanks !

-Sam
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#9 tylerhawes

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Posted 03 August 2005 - 12:45 PM

Good question, Sam. I don't want to hijack this thread, but let me briefly answer. If the original poster (filmmaker999) finds it relevant I can give more details here, or else I can answer further questions off-board...

If you don't already have a preferred film lab or are open to another, we have a partnership with a large established film lab here in L.A. using Imagica scanners and Spirit Datacines. We have an established workflow with them and run constant tests to maintain consistancy of results. Scans are "Super 2K" (scanned at 4K and interpolated down to 2K).

In case you prefer another lab, we're happy to oblige and will simply need to do some extra calibration and testing runs to get setup in that case. We'll then take the output from them as data or on HDCAM-SR (we have an SRW-5500).


Hi Tyler, I didn't find any reference to doing the scanning or telecine on your website.

Does one get a flat grade elsewhere & then bring files or tape to your facility ? Or do you guys do the film transfers - i.e. did I miss something ?

Thanks !

-Sam

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


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#10 Sam Wells

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Posted 03 August 2005 - 03:10 PM

Thanks for the answer !

-Sam
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#11 Paul Bruening

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Posted 17 August 2005 - 11:22 PM

Hey Sam,

Everyone wants the best for cheap. I am especially hungry for such services. However, some realistic decisions about your marketing strategy may allow you to save a great deal of money on your post production costs. While that sounds quite obvious to anyone, getting real about where and how your product can reasonably show, given your marketing budget, is not absurd. Best of luck in your production.
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