Jump to content


Photo

60p Delivery


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Macks Fiiod

Macks Fiiod
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1160 posts
  • Director
  • Og from DC, Now in NJ

Posted 26 August 2017 - 05:50 PM

Anyone else been forced to finish a project in 60p for a client?

 

It looks so ugly to me, but ever since youtube started pushing it (before their regular framerates handle 24 without dropping) I get asked by clients all the time for it,

 

Longer to render and the payoff isn't worth it.

 

How do you talk your way out of it if at all possible?

 

Thanks.

 

 


  • 0

#2 Tyler Purcell

Tyler Purcell
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3725 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 26 August 2017 - 10:38 PM

Never heard of such a thing in my entire life. I do a LOT of web deliverables and nobody does 60p. Everyone does "native" frame rate, so 23.98 or 29.97 which are the industry standards.

Was the content shot and edited in 60p too? I mean eh?
  • 0

#3 Landon D. Parks

Landon D. Parks
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1735 posts
  • Producer
  • Cincinnati, Ohio

Posted 26 August 2017 - 10:53 PM

The real fun is when you get clips from 4 different cameras, shooting different aspect ratios, with different file types, and different frame rates, and a single deliverable is expected from it. Talk about issues from hell. 

 

I have never dealt with or delivered 60p footage. All my deliverables are either at 24p for DCI, or 23.98p for web. One documentary I did post work on I delivered in 29.97p, that that one was the odd one out of the bunch. 

 

I'm curious why someone is requesting a 60p delivery. That doesn't appear to be any standard sort of format. Standards are 24fps for DCI, 23.98fps for most other uses. There is also the old interlaced carryovers of 30i and 60i, but no one uses those to any degree any longer. 29.97 is common as well in television. 

 

Edit: I don't even see standard options in export menu for Resolve for anything other than 24, 23.98 and 30.00. The one 29.97 project I did was in Premiere, kind of odd to not see 29.97 in Resolve though. 


Edited by Landon D. Parks, 26 August 2017 - 10:59 PM.

  • 0

#4 Bruce Greene

Bruce Greene
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 493 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 27 August 2017 - 01:18 PM

The real fun is when you get clips from 4 different cameras, shooting different aspect ratios, with different file types, and different frame rates, and a single deliverable is expected from it. Talk about issues from hell. 

 

I have never dealt with or delivered 60p footage. All my deliverables are either at 24p for DCI, or 23.98p for web. One documentary I did post work on I delivered in 29.97p, that that one was the odd one out of the bunch. 

 

I'm curious why someone is requesting a 60p delivery. That doesn't appear to be any standard sort of format. Standards are 24fps for DCI, 23.98fps for most other uses. There is also the old interlaced carryovers of 30i and 60i, but no one uses those to any degree any longer. 29.97 is common as well in television. 

 

Edit: I don't even see standard options in export menu for Resolve for anything other than 24, 23.98 and 30.00. The one 29.97 project I did was in Premiere, kind of odd to not see 29.97 in Resolve though. 

There is a 720P/60 standard for HD deliverables.  Some major U.S. networks, such as ABC, use this standard for broadcast.  Others use 1080i.

 

24fps/23.98fps can be easily converted to 60p by adding pulldown.  On a mixed frame rate camera original project (23.98 + 30p + 60i), if it's destined for 60p or 60i delivery, it may be easiest to add pull down to the 24fps clips and convert them to 30 or 60 to match the other footage before editing begins.  And then deliver 60p or 60i if that format is requested.


  • 0

#5 Macks Fiiod

Macks Fiiod
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1160 posts
  • Director
  • Og from DC, Now in NJ

Posted 27 August 2017 - 02:34 PM

Was the content shot and edited in 60p too? I mean eh?

In addition to the live action shots, there were a bunch of post motion infographics. And when it's tweening the frame rate is technically infinite. However when it gets all the way up to 60, animation loses a bit of its snap.


  • 0

#6 AJ Young

AJ Young
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 156 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 28 August 2017 - 10:11 PM

How do you talk your way out of it if at all possible?

 

It's important to remember that frame rates are defined by the producers. They have an end delivery format that they have agreed with the investors which will turn a profit.

 

As DP's, we can of course recommend a frame rate, but in the end the decision is above our pay grade.

 

We have more say if the project wasn't shot in 60p, but we can't complain when we entered the project knowing it was intended to be shot in 60p.

 

One of the questions I always ask in the initial interview is the intended frame rate for the final delivery. Seems trivial on the surface, but it helps me gauge what kind of production I'm potentially joining.


  • 0


The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

CineLab

Metropolis Post

Opal

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

The Slider

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Opal

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine