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How to frame a scene with this 16mm ground glass.....


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#1 Stephen Perera

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 08:41 AM

a simple one to confirm what i think.....

 

do I frame a scene within the thick black frame (i.e. the demarcated area INSIDE the thick black frame) or from the 'safe area' markings in the corners......

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Edited by Stephen Perera, 29 August 2017 - 08:42 AM.

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#2 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 09:32 AM

The thick black line is the frame line. The lines inside the corners are 'TV Safe' designed to compensate for TV sets that overscan. This tends not to be a problem these days.


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#3 Stephen Perera

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 09:33 AM

thanks...so inside the thick black line.....Arsenal didn't do great this weekend...Man U myself


Edited by Stephen Perera, 29 August 2017 - 09:35 AM.

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#4 AJ Young

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 03:37 PM

Don't forget to shoot a framing chart!

 

http://www.cinematog...showtopic=15084

 

http://www.stringerc...s/frameing.html


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#5 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 11:14 PM

Don't forget to shoot a framing chart!

 

 

There's no need unless he is framing with the intention to crop in post.


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#6 Stephen Perera

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 02:46 AM

thanks all...as usual


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#7 Stephen Perera

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 03:03 AM

cou

 

l'd you explain the framing chart procedure in simple terms.....

 

as I understand it logically its like when I shoot Hasselblad 6 x 6 with the intention of using the shot say in an A4 portrait brochure...I would produce a mask on my ground glass of two lines as a framing guide to know how much surplus width I have in the frame in this case......

 

......in THIS case I would be rolling standard 16mm gate with a standard 16mm ground glass.....

 

so if I wanted to shoot for a 16:9 TV ratio for example how does a framing chart translate to this.....the workflow for me is shoot the film...send to lab and they telecine or 2k scan and I run it all in daVinci resolve.....should I wish to create a widescreen version of it all I would need to know that whilst Im shooting of course......

 

so in reality I see 'the problem' being for me to somehow see the lines of my framing for widescreen as I shoot as I will do my own post framing and editing


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#8 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 10 September 2017 - 09:47 PM

Shooting a framing chart only helps if it corresponds to markings in the VF. If you have access to a camera technician, you could ask them to remove the ground glass and temporarily mark it with scotch tape in a 16:9 ratio. This often done with older 16mm cameras, and works pretty well. You just do a center extraction in post. If you can't get this done, the other option is to use what is called a 'Top-line' extraction. This where you frame with normal headroom in the 4:3 frame, but make sure there is nothing important in the bottom 1/5 of the frame. Then, in post you extract the 16:9 frame using the top of the 4:3 frame, and cropping the bottom.

 

Actually, I took a look at your ground glass. I put the image in Photoshop, and put a 16:9 box over it, and I'd say that if you were to use the top of your existing frame, and then use the lower white line on the left side as your bottom of frame, you wouldn't be too far off. Down and dirty, but it would work.


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#9 AJ Young

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Posted 10 September 2017 - 10:17 PM

so if I wanted to shoot for a 16:9 TV ratio for example how does a framing chart translate to this.....the workflow for me is shoot the film...send to lab and they telecine or 2k scan and I run it all in daVinci resolve.....should I wish to create a widescreen version of it all I would need to know that whilst Im shooting of course......

 

Like what Stuart said, a framing chart is used together with the viewfinder and ground glass. Rolling on the framing chart, at the bare minimum, defines where on the actual film your frame is.

 

In theory, you would shoot the framing chart lined exactly with the ground glass. The telecine may ignore the framing chart and scan the entire film, but it gives you a starting point for what your original framing was intended to be (because you framed everything for the outlines on the ground glass).


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#10 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 10 September 2017 - 10:24 PM

 

The telecine may ignore the framing chart and scan the entire film

Ideally, you want them to transfer the whole frame, rather than crop, so that you can re-rack the picture in post.


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#11 Stephen Perera

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 04:29 AM

thanks for the excellent advice as always


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