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Switar 1.6 10mm lens Great Condition Focus Ring Stuck Help


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#1 Kirk Billingsley

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 09:32 PM

Hello, growing bored of super 8 use I have just purchased a mint Beaulieu R16 package with multiple accessories and three Switar lenses. All in very good cosmetic condition. The 100mm and 25mm are in perfect working order. The 10mm is pristine but the focus ring is stuck on 30 Feet, it will not budge. I've tries lubrication overnight, I loosened the set grub screws and it of course turns but the cam. This was the one that I really wanted to use right off.

 

I looked on Old Timer Cameras in the UK for repair manuals as that is where I have purchased all my super 8 ones. Looked on Craigs Camera and nothing there either. Google and youtube have also been a bust.

 

I'm hoping someone here may have an idea how to remedy this problem.

 

Thank you in advance for any support

 

Kirk Billingsley


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#2 Dom Jaeger

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 09:57 PM

It's a common problem with Switars, they used a particular grease which can turn very hard over time. The only solution is to remove the old grease and relubricate the threads.

Unfortunately you will lose the back-focus collimation, but if eye-focussing anyway it's possible to reset it roughly by eye. Taking measurements can help.

You need to remove the 3 grub screws around the focus ring and pull the rear helical out. It will have a key that locates in one of the multiple keyways, which orients the witness mark so as to be visible when the lens is screwed onto your camera.

The helical will be very stiff and may need heating gently and/or some thinners in the threads to loosen. Once apart you can clean and relubricate both threads.
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#3 Kirk Billingsley

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 01:01 AM

Just the the Nikon R10 and 8 with their meter lubrication. Had an idea that might be the case but was also thinking mechanical. Thanks for the detailed response, this will be a fun little project. 

 

Thanks again.

 

Kirk


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#4 Robert Hart

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 01:43 PM

DANGER Will Robinson. Anything but really gentle and very slowly increasing heat near optical glass is an invitation to disaster and invitation accepted. If you have warm glass and you bring it into a cool environment, shock cooling will crack it. My personal preference would be to attempt to rejuvenate the frozen lube with thinners first but not so much as to have it go inside onto the glass elements or you may end up with stain glass and stains creeping inside of celled doublets - game over.


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#5 Dom Jaeger

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 07:36 PM

Yes that's a valid warning Robert. Excessive heat can cause issues with lens glass, including separation, softening of compounds that sometimes hold elements in place, and even cracked elements. It can also deform plastic parts like cam followers or Teflon shims. I sometimes have to use heat on lenses to remove strongly secured grub screws or lock rings, but I'm very careful about it, and have a heat gun that is adjustable and narrowly focussed.

 

In this case I was suggesting using gentle heat on the rear helical after removing it from the lens body, so just the two metal threaded rings. But certainly try thinners first.

 

I should reiterate that removing the helical (even undoing the grub screws and turning the ring) will lose the precise back-focus setting relative to the focus scale, so the scale will not be reliable and infinity may not be sharp. You really need a collimator to set something like a 10mm accurately.


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#6 Jean-Louis Seguin

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 08:58 AM

I sometimes use a C-mount extension tube or an old turret to provide a better grip on the back end. Using rubber gloves helps. Just pull straight out.
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#7 Simon Wyss

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 09:39 AM

It happens occasionally that I submerge a lens in white spirit over night. Only all metal and glass systems, of course. A Switar 10-1.6 is such a candidate. Once apart everything must be cleaned, down to the last diaphragm blade and bolt.


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