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Panavision Grants


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#1 Jody Custer

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Posted 29 June 2005 - 05:49 PM

I am applying for a Panavision grant for 35mm film. What if they do not not have an offer for 35mm? If I don't get it for 35, what do you think about doing it super-16? This is my thesis project, most of it will be shot at night. That is why, among other reasons as well, I want 35, for better rendering of the night shots. How is super-16 with scenes at night? I think I want more "35 vs. 16" comments posted! Just kidding...well sort of.
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#2 Charles Haine

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Posted 01 July 2005 - 05:10 PM

If I remember correctly, the Panavision student/spec/experimental program has 4 GII's available, and only 2 Elaine's, so, even though the demand for the 35mm package is higher, there are also more available.

I've also frequently heard that with the Panavision grant, scheduling is as big a deal as anything else. How far away are you from principal? Any flexibility on those dates if it would help you get the Panavision package?

I say this because, really, whether to shoot Super16 or 35 is a decision that shouldn't be put in Panavisions hands for your thesis film. Yes, they make great equipment, and the glass is the best on earth, but if you want to shoot 35, there are other options.

The prep fee for the Panavision 35mm package in 35 is $1500. I know many people who have paid less for their thesis film camera package from other houses (your school might have worked out a deal with someone). You won't get to shoot Panavision glass, but the Cooke S4s or Zeiss Ultra Speeds are arguably of equal quality (though I don't want to start a glass-quality argument here, there are some who prefer Panavision, some who prefer Cooke, some who prefer Lomo).

So, if you want to shoot 35 (and I'm assuming spherical, as you talk about night shoots, but you can get good rentals on Aanamorphic lens's too), put your hussle into the Panavision grant, if you don't get it, see if you can't re-schedule for them and get it, if not, call Clairmont, Alan Gordon, Brins&Sawyer, the Camera House, or one of the smaller guys who don't come to mind immediately, and tell them it's your thesis, why you are burning to shoot this on 35, and see what you can work out.

This is also a case where your DP might have developed a good relationship with a rental house from their other work that might benefit you.

I've never shot with the Elaine, the Super16 Panaflex, but I've heard rumors that it's not a super-modern camera, works but lacks the Bells&Whistles of an SR-3, so if you do decide Super16 (for Budget or aesthetic reasons), you might still want to consider another house.

Of course, if you aren't planning any slo-mo, or shutter-ramps, maybe the Elaine is perfect for you.

Know what format you are finishing on? I just color timed a Super16 short on HD last week, and was really stunned with how the Vision2 200 (7217, on SuperSpeeds, shot pretty much the whole thing at 1.4) held up to HD. If we blew up to 35, you'd know it was 16, but I bet 95% of the audience that sees the HD will think it's 35.

Which, of course, is what the director wanted, but couldn't afford.

good luck,

chuck haine
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#3 Jody Custer

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Posted 06 July 2005 - 01:32 PM

Thank you for your feedback and expertise. I greatly appreciate your response
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#4 Jody Custer

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 01:19 PM

Yesterday,I learned that I received the Panavision full 35mm package! Shooting in September, I am elated
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#5 Charles Haine

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 04:33 AM

Congratulations, that's great. The GII is sweet. Dig the snake leather on the door.
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#6 Sol Train Saihati

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 05:58 AM

Do any Panapeople know if this grant system extends to the UK?? Or will I have to keep begging/harrassing them unitl they lend me a dusty Panaflex for a few days?
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#7 Jake Kerber

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 12:08 AM

I shot a super-35 short for a friend who received the 'first-time filmmaker' grant from Panavision.

A couple things to think about:

? Yes, you are shooting Panavision glass, but your set of primes will probably be Mark II's. This is older glass that tends to be inconsistent lense to lense--you need to put together your own set that matches to your satisfaction. Just be really particular when you do your camera prep and be extra critical about these lenses--especially the mid-range. Also, the zoom lense that they supply you with will probably not cover S-35 at the wide end--I think it's a 25-250mm. If you're going for a more '70's' look and you like flairs, these lenses rock.

? Your filter selection will probably be minimal at best.

? Overall, when working under this grant, Panavision is probably not going to be supportive when it comes to adding equipment that is not on your grant list. Just keep this in mind if you know you have some special shots that need special equipment, etc. If they are busy, which they should be at that time, you are not a priority.

The GII is a workhorse and a fine camera.

-Jake Kerber
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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 12:23 AM

You know, whenever I have to use "older glass" (workhorse lenses from the 1970's & 1980's mainly) I try and remember all the great-looking movies shot on those lenses, like "Days of Heaven"... somehow those guys managed to shoot some of the best-looking movies ever made with these lenses. Especially if you're a student shoot and getting a free 35mm Panaflex camera, then you're already way ahead of the game compared to other students.
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#9 Max Jacoby

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 05:47 AM

Do any Panapeople know if this grant system extends to the UK?? Or will I have to keep begging/harrassing them unitl they lend me a dusty Panaflex for a few days?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


As far as I know Panavision UK have a Super16 package for students available. I also know people who got a 35mm anamorphic package from them for free, but that obviously doesn't happen all the time.
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#10 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 05:51 AM

Hi,

> As far as I know Panavision UK have a Super16 package for students available

Not a - shriek - Elaine?

Aaargh!

Phil
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#11 Max Jacoby

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 07:05 AM

An Arri SR2
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#12 Cohen Phillips

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 01:45 PM

I was thinking of submitting for this grant for one of the 16mm cameras. Any tips okdac? Seems like you heard back from them pretty quick. Another question to everyone is that if you get the full package do they give you a support system(tripod) for the camera? Just wondering.
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#13 Mike Williamson

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 02:01 PM

Congratulations, okdac, good luck with shooting! Could you give us some details about the grant, for example, how long you'll have the camera package for, what kind of camera and lenses you end up using, etc.

David's right about the older equipment, it's been used to shoot some amazing movies. Paul Cameron used Mark II lenses on "Man On Fire" last year, looks like the glass is still holding up pretty well.
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#14 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 06:46 PM

At film school, we used to get deals from Panavision. We always had these grand ideas of shooting with a 'real Hollywood' camera. Then we realised how difficult they were to thread. All of a sudden, we were really happy to receive an SR.....
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#15 Sol Train Saihati

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 06:50 PM

As far as I know Panavision UK have a Super16 package for students available. I also know people who got a 35mm anamorphic package from them for free, but that obviously doesn't happen all the time.

I've hired out that S16 kit before, at an unbeatable price I must say. But an anamorphic kit! They say you get about three favours out of Panavision and if you have'nt made any progress by then, you've pretty much run out of grace. Its time for some grovelling. And some kind of pitch animated by caffeine I imagine. But I guess it would'nt be any fun if you did'nt have to work for it.
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#16 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 07:52 PM

Hi,

I've only ever watched a Panaflex being laced up, but it didn't seem anywhere near as difficult as - say - the projector I do weekly. I rather like the way the whole movement rolls open. It's rather projectorlike.

Phil
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#17 Jody Custer

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 08:38 PM

Just wondering... about how much does a Panavision 35mm camera package cost?(10 day shoot) Someone asked me and I have no idea.
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#18 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 12 July 2005 - 03:19 AM

You can get a basic Panaflex GII for about $2000/week but that doesn't include things like lenses, tripods, video tap monitors, etc. $3000/week to $5000/week for a basic package would be reasonable.
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#19 Stephen Williams

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Posted 12 July 2005 - 04:28 AM

Hi,

I've only ever watched a Panaflex being laced up, but it didn't seem anywhere near as difficult as - say - the projector I do weekly. I rather like the way the whole movement rolls open. It's rather projectorlike.

Phil

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Hi,

Your right a Panavision style movement is dead easy to thread! Designed in the 1920's by the Mitchell Camera Co!

Stephen
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#20 Elhanan Matos

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 01:06 PM

the GII is very easy to thread. The Millenium XL is the tough one.
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