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Films, guides, suggestions for shooting in real (domestic) rooms?


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#1 David Mawson

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 10:42 AM

I'm looking for examples of films shot in genuine and typical houses and apartments, rather than sets made to look like them. And for suggestions or guides as to how to do this. 

 

So far the films to look at seem to be Godard's and Ken Loach's, but I'd appreciate other examples. Loach shoots in glances from quite long lenses, but this produces a claustrophobic feel and it isn't what I'm after, so it looks l need to do the unimaginative thing and use a wide angle, but I'd still like to do more research...


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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 02:09 PM

Many UK films are shot on location. "Get Carter", "Harry Brown" "Clockwork Orange" have scenes shot in real houses or apartments.


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#3 David Mawson

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 03:04 PM

Many UK films are shot on location. "Get Carter", "Harry Brown" "Clockwork Orange" have scenes shot in real houses or apartments.

 

That's excellent - I'd have thought all of these were studio shoots. That gives me plenty to work with.


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#4 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 04:58 PM

Could also try posting the specific questions you have pertaining to it. I know I personally have only done shoots inside of houses/apartments and have come up with workarounds for things every now and then.


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#5 David Mawson

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 05:58 PM

Could also try posting the specific questions you have pertaining to it. I know I personally have only done shoots inside of houses/apartments and have come up with workarounds for things every now and then.

 

Macks - thanks; that's really nice of you! At the moment I'm just trying to get a feel for overall possibilities and de-program my brain from a lifetime of seeing films shot in studio sets. And decide what focal lengths I want to use - I wanted to stick to (FF equivalent) 50 and 100, but looking at Loach's work makes me think that will give a claustrophobic look. So it looks like I need a 24 or 28 equivalent.

 

As someone who has done a lot of this, are there any specific things to especially avoid? Or a couple of key points people over look?


Edited by David Mawson, 13 September 2017 - 05:59 PM.

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#6 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 06:26 PM

I guarantee that you'll want lenses on the wider side with competent close focus. For instance, if shooting in a one bedroom apartment you'll find the need of going above 50mm focal length uncommon. I've done shorts where 90% of the shots were taken care of with a 35mm lens. That focal length is a bit of a swiss army knife.


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