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Office at night

office night

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#1 Michael Ognisanti

Michael Ognisanti
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Posted 18 September 2017 - 06:45 PM

Hi,

 

I have a shoot coming up where the scene is an empty office at night (we are shooting at night so no daylight issues).  I've attached a pic.  It's long tracking shot that starts really wide and ends on a close up on the back wall.

 

I'm wondering how to best create some ambient light to where we can see some detail and give the scene some context without having it look overly lit up.  Since we are starting so wide I don't think I can bounce anything off the ceiling because we are seeing it.

 

Any suggestions?

 

Thanks

Michael 

 

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#2 Jaron Berman

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Posted 18 September 2017 - 09:25 PM

Well it's night - so to differentiate between day / night especially a space without windows you probably don't want the overhead lights on anyways.  So if you can justify (even to yourself) a few places that light would be coming from after hours then you can start with those and "extend" or stylize from there.  Maybe there's a security light in a hallway off to the side?  Maybe an emergency exit light.  Maybe a soda machine?  These things all make light in real life, even at night - so you could justify that they would throw a little and help shape some details in the foreground while you track.  You probably don't want to flood the space, just shape some of the architectural or furniture shapes to give cues of what it is.  And for your subject - desk lamp nearby?  A strong sense of light near your subject will draw the eye to that portion of the frame while you move through the space and help set the tone that it's dark elsewhere.  The light doesn't have to "hit" your subject either - it could bounce off a desk or hit the wall and silhouette your subject - you have a lot of options aside from just top or front lighting.


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#3 Michael Ognisanti

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Posted 20 September 2017 - 12:11 PM

Thanks Jaron,

 

That is exactly the approach we took and it worked out nicely.  Instead of worrying about overall ambient we splashed light here and there to give the impression of something of screen.  Also, turned a few practicals on desks like they were left on when everyone left.  They helped give it some depth an avoided dead spaces in the shot.  Thanks for your advice.

 

Michael 


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