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Someone please help me with this camera!!


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#1 brooks_jones

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Posted 30 June 2005 - 07:02 PM

below is a Victor Model 5 16mm camera (lens not original) I just picked up at a flea market. When I wind the key and push down the shutter, I get no motor or anything. 1. Does anyone know anything about this camera? Date? Vintage? What may be wrong with it?
2. Further, does anyone know of someplace I can contact to check out or service this thing? Every place I call won't even touch it! Help pleeeease!

Thanks,
Brooks

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#2 Robert Hughes

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Posted 30 June 2005 - 08:51 PM

Brooks -

Your camera is probably from the 30's and isn't worth a lot of money, certainly not the rates that a professional camera repair shop would charge.

A good thing about very old movie cameras is that they are mechanically simple and straightforward to understand their workings, which means that you may have just nominated yourself to become the world Victor camera repair expert.

The main thing to find out is whether the mainspring is broken. Does the spring seem to be tensioning when you wind it, or does it remain rather loose & floppy? If the spring is shot you have a pretty doorstop, but if the spring engages you may be able to repair it yourself.

You may just have dried up oil in the works that needs flushing out. Or a door catch is bent and needs straightening.

If you can't stand the thought of getting your hands greasy on a 70 year old camera mechanism, you can buy a nice Arriflex SR3 for about $100,000, with warranty. Or even a 30 year old Bolex for $150. Good luck.
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#3 Herb Montes

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Posted 01 July 2005 - 06:58 AM

If the spring is broken this camera is still useable. I have a Victor model three (single lens model). The silver button above where the winding crank goes is where you can handcrank the camera. Turn the winding lever backwards to unscrew it from the camera. Pull out the button which is held by friction. Wind the lever onto the threaded post inside. Push down on the shutter button and turn to lock the camera on run and start handcranking. Your camera looks like in nice condition compared to mine. These early cameras only take double perf film though.
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#4 Robert Hughes

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Posted 01 July 2005 - 11:50 AM

And if you love that camera you can get the double perf sprockets machined down to take single perf, but "it's got to really want to change..." You'd probably be better off getting a newer camera than spending a lot of time on this one. For example a Bolex:

http://cgi.ebay.com/...7527552967&rd=1
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#5 brooks_jones

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Posted 01 July 2005 - 02:52 PM

Ahhh thanks so much! You guys are the best!

-Brooks
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#6 Herb Montes

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Posted 01 July 2005 - 04:04 PM

I just thought of one other thing that could be wrong with your camera. See that large button in the upper right of the camera body in the first picture that looks like a slotted screw head? That's for adjusting the speed governor on the camera while it is running. You can turn it with a coin. Turn it one way and camera speeds up, turn the other way and the camera slows down. If it is turned to far in the slow position the camera will stop. Try turning that button while operating the shutter release.
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#7 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 04 July 2005 - 10:05 AM

Brooks -

Your camera is probably from the 30's and isn't worth a lot of money, certainly not the rates that a professional camera repair shop would charge.

You may just have dried up oil in the works that needs flushing out. Or a door catch is bent and needs straightening.

If you can't stand the thought of getting your hands greasy on a 70 year old..... Or even a 30 year old Bolex for $150. Good luck.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I bought one Victor and inidiatly classed it as a colectable, becasue of the way the Film counter works. Mine has a spring that rides against the supply spool, and of course it is rough after all these years. I cannot imagine it working without scratching the film.

The Keystones (A3 A7 A9) at least have an arm that only rides the perf area.

The Keystones can be a nice low cost camera , but by the time I got a working one, I would have been better off to get a Filmo in the first place. I have yet to figure out if there is a patern as to which of the Keystone camera have the doubble sprokets.
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#8 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 04 July 2005 - 10:07 AM

I bought one Victor and inidiatly classed it as a colectable,

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


That of course show be INSTANTLY and Collectable..
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