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Wittner Chrome 200D Reversal - Push Processing


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#1 Hugo Alexandre

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 03:55 PM

1200_g.jpg

In a last-minute situation I used this stock to shoot inside a basement with low electric lighting. 

 

1) Does it make sense to push only +1 stop? Or should I go to +2 stops for a more striking effect?

 

2) Does anyone have experience push processing this film stock? How were the results? 

 

Any other info about push-processing Super8 stock would be appreciated.

 

Thank you!

 


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#2 Martin Baumgarten

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Posted 06 November 2017 - 06:18 PM

There will be a grain and contrast increase, as well as a color bias shift towards the red/orange range.  I would first take a light meter reading of whatever subject matter was lit by the lighting and see what Exposure Index [ISO equivalent] range it falls into.  For example, if there was a person in the scene, put someone in that spot, meter the light falling on the subject with a hand held light meter or 35mm SLR or DSLR and see what exposure range you have at ISO 200, ISO 400 or ISO 800.  Anything in the scene that falls below the threshold of the film's ability to record it in low light, will not have anything anyway.  By pushing film you are increasing whatever is actually being recorded on the film to bring the image density to a more desirable range.  Once you have determined this, you can then go ahead and push process the film, either 1 Stop, 1.5 Stops,2 Stops or even 3 Stops if necessary. [Note: a 3 stop push would be extremely dramatic and needs some careful consideration, but up to 2 Stops should be fine].  I have often pushed the now discontinued EKTACHROME films similiarly and gotten good results, with the caveat of the grain and contrast increase, and under tungsten lighting a very warm color bias.  For what I was working on, I was pleased versus having a very dark unusable image.  If you doing your own processing, I always recommend shooting a few feet of the scene that you might want to push, and then remove that strip and process it and evaluate it to see if the push is necessary.  You could do that from the end of your film, but you'd have to sacrifice a second or two of runtime of your film for that purpose.  Only you can determine if it's worth it to you.  Good luck!


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#3 Doug Palmer

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Posted 07 November 2017 - 04:53 AM

Apologies for a quick digression... has anyone tried to pull-process Wittnerchrome 200D ?  Say by a stop or even more than that.  I was wondering if the grain would become less obvious, akin to Ektachrome maybe.  I like the colour and subtle contrast but not the grain !


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#4 Maik Lobborn

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Posted 07 November 2017 - 10:51 AM

A Single-8 example @100 ASA can be found here:
http://www.colorreversalfilm.com

Edited by Maik Lobborn, 07 November 2017 - 10:52 AM.

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#5 Doug Palmer

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Posted 07 November 2017 - 02:54 PM

A Single-8 example @100 ASA can be found here:
http://www.colorreversalfilm.com

Thanks for that Maik.

I found it a bit hard to judge on the PC screen, but it's good to know that pulling to at least 100asa is possible, with potentially tighter grain. The 200asa footage looked good too, considering it's super-8.


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rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

CineTape