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#1 basic

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Posted 01 July 2005 - 07:47 PM

I'm now starting to delve into the professional side of film making, and I'm looked for some supplies:

-Boom, Mic, Cable, etc.
Where can I find the two, and all the attachments.

And also, I'm looking for something that protects a camera while its in water, and isn't heavy, i.e. it will be under and above water multiple times, like "Saving Private Ryan", in the beginning when the camera keeps moving above and below the water, rapidly.
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#2 drew_town

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Posted 02 July 2005 - 11:14 AM

www.bhphotovideo.com
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#3 basic

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Posted 02 July 2005 - 11:31 AM

Thank you!
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#4 basic

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Posted 02 July 2005 - 11:42 AM

Thank you!

(And one more question, most of the Booms can be taken out of their stands and held manually, no?)


sorry about the double posting, i'm not allowed to edit.
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#5 drew_town

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Posted 02 July 2005 - 01:53 PM

Thank you!

(And one more question, most of the Booms can be taken out of their stands and held manually, no?)
sorry about the double posting, i'm not allowed to edit.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

You'll need a "pistol grip." The pistol grip will have a threaded receiver on the end to fasten a boom pole to.

Pistol Grip with Blimp and Suspension

You can also make it a wireless system with something like this:

Wireless Transmitter
You will need a receiver for this. I've use a wireless boom system often and really like it.
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#6 Robert Hughes

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Posted 04 July 2005 - 02:41 PM

Although you probably shouldn't take boom, mic, cables, wireless etc into the water.
B-zzz-tt!!! 'Scratch one soundman'. :(

A/V supplier:
http://www.markertek.com
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#7 basic

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 02:50 PM

Haha! Yes, I was just thinking about this one. My next movie is a thriller, and most of it (well, some) takes place in a pool. I found one of those in-expensive water housings for an XL2 (that's what I have my sights set on) and I don't know if the mic would be able to stay in the housing. (I doubt it). So how would I record underwater without, um, dying? lol. When the actors move, the sound needs to match, and doing sound in post-production isnt really what I want.

Edit: Just in case, does anyone know any light-weight affordable under water housings for the XL2?

Edited by basic, 05 July 2005 - 02:53 PM.

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#8 Robert Hughes

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Posted 06 July 2005 - 10:57 AM

So you really need to record sound underwater? Look through some back issues of American Cinematographer for some background. Some recommendations:

- Safety is #1: Anytime you place electrical equipment in the water you are liable to potentially lethal safety ground issues. Check with your electrician before you go near the water with equipment, because << you - can - die >>. I'm not joking here. Even a small current drain can be enough to paralyse someone so they can't swim, breathe, or call for help. You'll probably need to use battery powered equipment that is not connected to AC mains, and get special safety permits from the city.

- Hydrophones are purpose-designed underwater microphones used by the Navy for recording whales, submarines, sonar pulses, etc. Usually they sound terrible, but can take the abuse of the underwater environment.

- A temporary underwater microphone can be made by pulling a condom over the microphone body and sealing the cable connection with bathtub sealant. The sound will be closer to what you expect, but you must verify that the condom / sealant is indeed watertight. Either a dynamic or condensor microphone may be used, but condensors in particular are severely affected by humidity, so you'll need to remove the condom and dry off the microphone immediately after use.

- Salt water is corrosive and ruins precision parts; don't put anything in salt water that you expect to work after you're done. If you're recording in salt water you may want to place your sealed microphone apparatus in a sealed plastic bag filled with -fresh- water to keep the salt away from your equipment.

Oftentimes the sound you get in an underwater recording isn't what you want anyway; you may need to recreate the sound in Foley later.
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#9 basic

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Posted 06 July 2005 - 02:53 PM

Oh.

Hello Post-Production Sound. lol

Ok, I'm going to not record underwater. I'll live without it.

I found out the under-water housing for the XL2 is made in Germany, and have no idea where to order it, there's no info. So does anyone have any idea where I can find light-weight, inexpensive under-water housing for the XL2?
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Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

CineTape

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

Opal

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets