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Dolly track joint issue


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#1 Stephen Perera

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 12:22 PM

Hi all....when joining the dolly track I notice the camera steps when it goes over the joint...very slight....is this normal or should it be totally smooth even over joints
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 12:48 PM

What sort of dolly track is it?

 

Even the very best stuff can be iffy, especially on long lenses, especially if it isn't very well laid.

 

P


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#3 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 07:29 PM

Bumps when dollying over joins in the track usually mean it's not laid properly. You can check with a builder's level. Lay it on the track, over a join. If there's a gap under the level, or if the level rocks back and fore over the joint, you need to adjust the wedges under the track to make it level.

 

Dents, and other damage to track ends can also cause problems, so check for that also.


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#4 Tristan Noelle

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 01:46 AM

Im not much of a dolly grip but Ive worked under some good ones. In my experience the smoothness of the track is is a function of how much time there is to set it. But but with enough time and good track on a fairly stable surface (not sand) and with few curves you should get it very stable.

Try to use an apple box (1/2,1/4, pancake, etc.) under the actual joints when you can if you need to elevate them, not just cribbing or a wedge. Also, what kind of surface are you on? If the surface underneath the joint is uneven or loose it can settle when the weight of the dolly hits it, so often a wedge or two under the apple box is necessary.

When you use the level, put weight on the track to spot issues. Sometimes a sandbag or two at the joints (if the channel wheels can go over them) is a good idea to help the track settle in and not shift.

Tristan
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#5 Stephen Perera

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 03:42 AM

thanks everyone for the tips!

 

but sorry what is 'an apple box (1/2, 1/4 pancake etc)......


Edited by Stephen Perera, 01 November 2017 - 03:43 AM.

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#6 Tristan Noelle

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 10:46 AM

In the US these are commonly called apple boxes.

BOXES.jpg
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#7 Stephen Perera

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 10:52 AM

haha excellent.....I've thought about it and patches of carpet would do the trick.....they have rubber underneath which would be non-slip and of course the top layer is what it is......


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#8 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 10:55 AM

You don't want to use anything soft, like carpet, under the track. Any movement at all will cause the track to flex, and you'll get a bump.


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#9 Stephen Perera

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 10:56 AM

.....thanks for the advice everyone....


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Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

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Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Opal

The Slider

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

CineLab

FJS International, LLC