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So is this just "flat" lighting?


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#1 Samuel Berger

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 01:58 AM

I am very interested in this comedy lighting style which I understand is not used very much anymore, and was wondering if it's simple to achieve in film.
What ASA would you choose, and would this be a matter of using lots of diffusion?
 
Here are some pictures, and at the end two sample Youtube videos.
 
lighting.jpg






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#2 Samuel Berger

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 03:21 AM

Coincidentally they are all in 1.66:1 aspect ratio.
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#3 Michael Rodin

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 09:51 AM

There's minimal diffusion. A rather hard key and generous fill, sometimes a kicker gets used.


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#4 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 08:38 PM

I think its just an "older" style.. when comedy had to be "bright" .. by todays standards it would probably be deemed as "bad" lighting.. unless it was purposely a look they wanted.. 


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#5 Samuel Berger

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 09:56 PM

I think its just an "older" style.. when comedy had to be "bright" .. by todays standards it would probably be deemed as "bad" lighting.. unless it was purposely a look they wanted.. 

 

Robin, how would one go about lighting like that?


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#6 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 01:18 AM

Well I dont think I ever would on purpose TBH .. unless the dir said I want it to look that way.. but I,d think its as Michael says before.. and film that was much lower ASA and they to just used alot of lights for every shot..even ext.. so it looks "lit" all the time..  ..something very out of fashion these days.. 

 

La Cage is different as you can see pretty strong use of fog filters .. which was a very 70,80,s thing.. 

 

Whats amazing is Depardieu looking so young !..and alot smaller than he is now.. 


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#7 Samuel Berger

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 09:55 AM

Ageing does impressive things. It's sad it can't truly be controlled. When he was young he was French. Now he's Russian. ;-)

 

I've always been challenged by lighting. One of the things I often say on here is that I've only ever lit interviews, and that was when the light guy didn't show up. It would take me a whole twenty minutes to set up four Lowel lights. I'd usually have the strongest one right above the camera facing backwards onto a large diffuse reflector.

 

One time I decided I was going to aim the light frontwards rather than set up the diffuser. It was the worst thing I ever lit. Everything looked yellow for no reason. I never had that happen before. It was 25 years ago and I'm still embarrassed by it. The interviewee gave a very powerful, touching interview about his time in Vietnam...and thanks to my experimentation it looked awful.

 

I've been building up the courage to light again ever since.


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#8 Samuel Berger

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 02:54 PM

I see what you mean now.

 

16C698BD000005DC-0-image-a-120_147455476


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#9 aapo lettinen

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Posted 11 November 2017 - 07:59 PM

most of it doesn't look particularly diffused and even when it seems to have some diffusion it is not that much.

I would maybe just have some fresnels or other lights and use either 250, 251 or 252 ( 216 if needed, I generally don't use that at all...just doubling the 250 if needing more than half diff) on barndoors depending on the look and light levels and spread wanted, and additionally have some 4x4 frames with the same diffusion medias and use the barndoors on the lights to crop a smaller area within the diffusion surface to light so that the light level and "softness" and "softness symmetry" could be controlled very easily by lighting different size and shaped rectangles on the diffusion surface. if needing more area than 4x4 just setting two of them side by side


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