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How much should I charge client for a Rap Music Video?


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#1 Anthony Liu

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 03:25 PM

Hey there!

 

I have a prospective client right now that's asking me for a rate to shoot his music video, he is not too sure what he wants but is using this weekend to think about it, what do you think i should charge? This is gonna be my first music video shoot, so im really not sure if $150 or $200 is reasonble, but at the same time, im not sure what other expenses I should take into account besides for gas. I know for sure, im going to have to guide and lead him a lot and do a lot of preproduction/ production work/ location scouting/ visual effects post work (like editing, video flickering, etc), so should i add a premium to that and maybe charge an extra $50-$200 to account for the proproduction/ location scouting work/ editing work? What is a newbie like me to charge at a reasonable rate?  do you think $300-$500 is reasonable?

 

he wants some cool backgrounds and stuff and its going to be a rap MV. So what I have right now at my disposal is a Movi 5, sony a6300, 18-105 G lens/ f4m.

 

What else do you think im gonna need, should I consider borrowing a f1.8 lens for low light shooting for night? and also, do you know any cool locations or backdrops i can use without a permit in Los Angeles Area or anything that can get the look and feel that he might be going for a a hardcore rapper? I would attach his songs to give you guys a feel for his style of music, but i cant and im not sure about uploading his tracks to youtube and linking. But any advice would be helpful. Thanks guys!!

 

Anthony


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#2 James Compton

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 05:47 PM

  You are in Los Angeles. Charge $750. Tell the client you want half up front. Make the client sign a contract(1 page is sufficient) and have the document notarized(UPS store, the customer service desk at a grocery store) and make copies. Tell the client you will charge a fee for late arrivals to the set on the day of the shoot(notorious on music video shoot- you will learn B)) . DO NOT give away the finished edit until you are paid the second half in full. Be firm. Many wannabe musicians will attempt to take advantage of your lack of experience.

 

 Scout the locations ahead of time, take photos. Make a simple storyboard to help make the ideas concrete in the clients mind. REMEMBER, your time is valuable. Do not take crap from anyone even though you are just starting out. Most of all-HAVE FUN! :)


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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 07:28 PM

I think even 740 is WAY to cheap. You need to know what they want-- sit down with them (maybe for free) to figure out EXACTLY THEIR IDEA and your own and then BUDGET WHAT IT ACTUALLY COSTS and charge them accordingly. Ballpark I'd start around $3000 or so for a basic, simple, video.


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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 09:28 PM

This is LA, it's an expensive proposition to shoot here. Insurance and permits will easily top 1K by themselves. Without those things, locations themselves can be challenging. Granted he needs to know their budget, but he also has to be honest with them if their budget doesn't really allow for what they want.


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#5 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 19 November 2017 - 02:00 AM

The guys above are established professionals, and none of what they are saying is wrong however;

 

I'm assuming you're not established, assuming the artist is not established, and assuming both of you are broke.

 

Asking for a fair rate (loosely detailed above) with people who obviously won't have the money upfront usually results in you not getting the gig at all. Permits are something you're just going to have to throw out the window if the budget is being conversed with 3 digits in mind. Shoot quick and get out of where ever you're shooting. Make heavy use of secluded interiors and heavily rely on creative angles/movements, shallow DoF, and creative editing.

 

Again, all assuming your resources are next to nothing.


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#6 Samuel Berger

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Posted 19 November 2017 - 02:28 AM

It's a rap video. Tell them you want $1000. If they pay, you got well paid for a rap video. If they don't pay you've saved yourself the headache of shooting a rap video.


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#7 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 19 November 2017 - 02:45 AM

How is a rap video any more of a headache than any other music video?


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#8 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 19 November 2017 - 03:53 AM

How is a rap video any more of a headache than any other music video?

 

 

They don't sing properly .. crouch down a lot .. and often grab their crown jewels ..


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#9 James Compton

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Posted 19 November 2017 - 11:39 AM

@Macks

 

Real talk. I can tell you have shot guerilla style in a big city. It's easy. It takes planning and hustling skills. A sub $1000 mv in LA is possible and happens a lot. That stuff winds up on VIMEO/YOUTUBE. Do we want to do that stuff? No, of course not.The problem is that the client must be made SERIOUSLY aware of the limitations. Shoot the video. Get your money, don't work for such a low price anymore. Don't make a habit of selling rocket trips to the moon for $1.


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#10 Anthony Liu

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Posted 20 November 2017 - 01:52 PM

This discussion has been so helpful! Yea, I was told by some friends to just ask for an equipment budget to make it look dope. so im guessing i might want to charge around $500-$1000, but definitely by communicating limitations of the project <-- that is really important. and my time spent on it as well it makes a lot of sense. Thanks guys!


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