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#1 Mathew Collins

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 07:19 PM

I want to know about the best Viewing Glass for sun to and to center lights?

Would viewing sun through Viewing Glass harm the eyes?

Is there any alternate ways to watch sun position of bight/dull/steady positions?

 

Thanks in advance,

Mathew Collins.


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#2 Chris Steel

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Posted 08 December 2017 - 12:40 PM

I've seen gaffers hold up a heavy viewing glass up to check cloud coverage. They've all had a small square of thick black tape in the middle of the glass to cover the sun itself. Still seems risky to me.

 

Can't recommend looking directly at the sun ever, even through heavy filtration. UV radiation is not good for your eyes and the sun puts out a LOT of UV.

 

If you plan on looking at the sun regularly, get an official sun filter or glasses. Anything for viewing an eclipse should work but it might be tricky to see thin cloud coverage. And even then, I would avoid looking directly at the sun and looking for as short a time as possible.

 

As for best brand of gaffers glass, no idea. I'll let those that have more than none make recommendations :)


Edited by Chris Steel, 08 December 2017 - 12:42 PM.

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#3 Mathew Collins

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Posted 08 December 2017 - 10:30 PM

I've seen gaffers hold up a heavy viewing glass up to check cloud coverage. They've all had a small square of thick black tape in the middle of the glass to cover the sun itself. Still seems risky to me.

 

Can't recommend looking directly at the sun ever, even through heavy filtration. UV radiation is not good for your eyes and the sun puts out a LOT of UV.

 

If you plan on looking at the sun regularly, get an official sun filter or glasses. Anything for viewing an eclipse should work but it might be tricky to see thin cloud coverage. And even then, I would avoid looking directly at the sun and looking for as short a time as possible.

 

As for best brand of gaffers glass, no idea. I'll let those that have more than none make recommendations :)

 

Chris, Thanks much for sharing your experience.

 

From the information found in net, there is no recommend viewing glass which protects eyes. Some people suggest 'Welder glass of shade T-10 or denser'.

 

Would Sunglasses with UV protection (99 or 100 per cent protection of UV-A and UV-B) help?


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#4 Chris Steel

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Posted 09 December 2017 - 05:10 AM

If your glasses or viewers "are compliant with the ISO 12312-2 safety standard, you may look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun through them for as long as you wish" - NASA

 

I don't think sunglasses will be strong enough to look at the sun, even with UV protection.

 

Welders glass with UV cut will work also. I'd still want to cover the sun with a completely opaque spot just incase though


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#5 Mathew Collins

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Posted 09 December 2017 - 07:18 AM

Tha

 

If your glasses or viewers "are compliant with the ISO 12312-2 safety standard, you may look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun through them for as long as you wish" - NASA

 

I don't think sunglasses will be strong enough to look at the sun, even with UV protection.

 

Welders glass with UV cut will work also. I'd still want to cover the sun with a completely opaque spot just incase though

 

Thanks Chris.

 

I would start using my smartphone screen for viewing.


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#6 Frank Barrera

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Posted 10 December 2017 - 02:32 PM

The industry standard is the Alan Gordon Gaffer's Glass.

 

https://www.alangord...ducts/blue-ring

 

I've been using one for many years. As it says in the manufacture's disclosure, when viewing the sun's position, this is meant for cloud cover where the sun goes in and out. I have tried the reflection technique with sunglasses or a cell phone screen but this has little practical usage because the point of the exercise is to make an estimation of time as to when the clouds will clear or cover the sun so the production can resume. The reflection in any surface is too small to make an estimate. You need to look directly at the clouds/sun.  Obviously this is done with an abundance of caution.

 

I've been using and been around others using the Alan Gordon Glass for 25 years now and have not heard of a single incident of someone damaging their eyes. And in that time I have never seen anyone give a remotely accurate time estimate using the reflection technique.

 

Good luck and be safe.

 


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#7 Mathew Collins

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Posted 12 December 2017 - 09:37 PM

The industry standard is the Alan Gordon Gaffer's Glass.

 

https://www.alangord...ducts/blue-ring

 

I've been using one for many years. As it says in the manufacture's disclosure, when viewing the sun's position, this is meant for cloud cover where the sun goes in and out. I have tried the reflection technique with sunglasses or a cell phone screen but this has little practical usage because the point of the exercise is to make an estimation of time as to when the clouds will clear or cover the sun so the production can resume. The reflection in any surface is too small to make an estimate. You need to look directly at the clouds/sun.  Obviously this is done with an abundance of caution.

 

I've been using and been around others using the Alan Gordon Glass for 25 years now and have not heard of a single incident of someone damaging their eyes. And in that time I have never seen anyone give a remotely accurate time estimate using the reflection technique.

 

Good luck and be safe.

 

 

Good information Frank.

 

I have seen some people are using Kodak and Fuji viewing glasses. Do you have some experience with those glasses?

 

I could read in the product features of Alan Gordon Gaffer's Glass that,

"The Blue Ring Gaffer’s Glass™ is not designed to look directly at the sun. Use it only to locate the sun through clouds".


Edited by Mathew Collins, 12 December 2017 - 09:42 PM.

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#8 Frank Barrera

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 11:03 PM

I am not familiar with the kodak or fuji glasses.


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