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Taping magazines, standard procedure?


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#1 Robino Jones

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 01:34 AM

I never taped my Aaton 35 III magazines and never got any leaks. Now every-time I see BTS images of film shoots the magazines are always taped - even Panavision mags.. 

 

Is this standard procedure for film loaders as an extra precaution for light leaks or is it for stock identification?

 

I'm shooting a project tomorrow and I just taped my 3 mags all around, between the doors just to be sure.

 

 


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#2 Samuel Berger

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 01:41 AM

I'm shooting a project tomorrow and I just taped my 3 mags all around, between the doors just to be sure.


Then your problems are over.

It is indeed an extra precaution, there's no reason to not tape up the magazines. Even a hairline bend somewhere can cause you to lose a lot of money.
Some people use white tape, others use black. I use this: https://www.amazon.c...uct/B00ZRYP38I/ But there are better options.
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#3 Robino Jones

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 02:48 AM

Ok great and good to know, thanks for confirming!


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#4 aapo lettinen

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 03:27 AM

most cameras don't need to be taped around all the door seams, even my Konvas mags can manage without all-round taping.

 

high-vibration and other rough environment applications are a different matter and may sometimes require all-round taping. 

 

the main purpose of the tape is to identify that the magazine actually has film in it and what stuff that is and which reels etc. 

If having no tape on it at all there is a great change that someone thinks the mag is empty and accidentally opens it which would ruin the film completely. 

Generally the taping over the mag lock and another tape over the mag door is enough for identification and secures the mag well enough. 

 

All seam taping is very useful in dusty environment though with all kind of mags  ^_^


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#5 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 04:46 AM

Aapo, I don't know if we can usefully apply simple generalizations. Which are the magazines that need to be taped...?


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#6 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 04:47 AM

I would tend to tape CP16 mags seams, the latches can be occasionally sprung open during day to day handling.


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#7 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 05:02 AM

In the 80s people taped around the mag seal. Eclair ACL, Arri 16BL, Arri 2, the SR I can't remember. Those mags haven't gotten any younger. Maybe there are newer cameras with better seals. Maybe the philosophy on this changed...I don't know.

 

Taping mags is pretty easy. Good tape is just re-used. I liked a Scotch black paper camera tape. Opaque, couldn't see the magnalite through it, and it came off clean even after like 15 years if left where it shouldn't be.  Some of the normal gaffer tapes I found the gum hard to get off if mistakenly left for a while on gear....

 


Edited by Gregg MacPherson, 04 January 2018 - 05:05 AM.

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#8 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 07:23 AM

It wasn't usual to tape around the seal of Aaton 16mm or SR  co axial mags ..in the UK in the 80,s anyway.. you would use the tape from the can to tape around the mags top to bottom .. over the mag latches .. sort of not a shape you could do the seal very well either.. but I did tape the 35mm displacement mags..  easier to do and usually more at stake I guess..


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#9 Simon Wyss

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 08:41 AM

A lot of adhesives residue tells the tech that a camera was in use. Not the most loved job to remove the goo.

The going got rougher regrettably. If crews would take a little more care of the most important equipment in movie production, tape on magazine rims were not necessary.

 

The canister seal tape should be disposed of to avoid misunderstandings. Fresh white or grey fabric adhesive tape should be used to reseal a can that holds exposed stock and EXPOSED  EXPOSED  EXPOSED written on it with a water-proof felt marker. The date may be added. Nothing should be done to the label so that the lab people have the full data. When taping a few cans together the uppermost should be stacked for label protection.

 

My 2 ¢


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#10 aapo lettinen

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 09:54 AM

the tape may actually damage the paint on some cameras so too much tape can actually be pretty bad too. 

generally mags don't need tape all over the place IF the light seals and all the locks are in good condition and undamaged and the mag doors are not bent/the hinges work correctly etc. 

 

As said even the Konvas mags can manage without tape in normal shooting.

 

generally the older mags with large doors (400/1000ft) and only one or two small locks may need the taping and other mags may require it if shooting shaky material handheld /lots of camera vibrations/etc OR shooting in dusty environment where it is necessary to protect the mag very well (though plastic bag or rain cover may be more practical for that than only taping the seams... 

 

One reason why I'm not a big fan of excessive use of tapes is that they become very sticky and difficult to remove in low temperatures <_<


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#11 aapo lettinen

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 09:58 AM

reminds me of the people who don't dare to change daylight spools to the camera in daylight because of the fear of "accidentally ruining the whole roll by taking it out of the mag in light"  :lol:


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#12 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 11:20 AM

Generally when shooting film; which was long ago; we taped the mags. It was both an extra precaution, as well as a way of identifying the stock loaded in the mag (and if the mag was loaded) quickly. Satsuki in 2007 mentions the old "suggested" tape pen colors:

 

http://www.cinematog...showtopic=22088


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#13 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 11:43 AM

If I was shooting 16mm without an assistant (which happened on some TV programmes) I'd wrap the tape from the raw stock can around from bottom to top, over the latches on both sides of my Aaton. Regardless of this, there would always be tape at some point on the side of mag, if only giving very basic info like roll number and stock details. If you don't, everything can get confused very quickly.

 

On larger productions, the assistant put in place their own mag taping system.


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#14 Chris Steel

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 12:48 PM

Having loaded film only a few times, I'm no expert but taping the seals and latches on older mags is a no brainer.

I had an SR2 mag pop open on me while taking it out of the loading bag having just checked the latches and door closures. Fortunately we only lost a cliptest worth from the otherwise fresh roll.

The latch on the feed side was very worn and would just give up occasionally. It went in for repair after the job but it had to stay in rotation so tape was very much in order.


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#15 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 02:15 PM

I never taped my Aaton 35 III magazines and never got any leaks.


Yea the Aaton 35 III magazines (like most modern cameras) have a very good sealing system that locks in place. The only way you'd get a light leak with that magazine is through the front where it connects to the camera. Be very cautious about that area, don't put it on the camera in bright light for instance. There is a rubber seal in that area, but it's hokey.

 

With the Aaton magazines (16 or 35) I always tape down the latches to prevent then turning by accident. I found this really neat stick-on whiteboard material that I use on my mags for "identifying" film stocks. It's just write-on and you can use permanent marker to put it on and if you use whiteboard marker over it, you can take it right off, no tape necessary. I'm not a fan of sticking tape on the 35III magazines because it will eventually pull off that gray coating, I've seen it happen. The XTR mags are fine to tape to. 


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#16 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 02:17 PM

It's not that it's 100% going to leak; but as the change of leak isn't 0% you do all you can to prevent it.


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#17 Will Montgomery

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 11:04 AM

the main purpose of the tape is to identify that the magazine actually has film in it and what stuff that is and which reels etc.

 

Yep.

 

Big ugly bright colored tape means "think twice before opening."

 

Old 2C mags might benefit from a little light leak protection honestly.


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