Jump to content


Photo

Flagging Tips?

light control flagging

  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Seth Baldwin

Seth Baldwin
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 39 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Australia

Posted 07 February 2018 - 08:36 AM

Got a gig that will require a lot of soft street light outside. My question doesn't really relate to our lighting setup but more a question regarding the science and possibilities of controlling light.

 

So we have 2 Arri M40's each separately going through 8 x 8 diffusion frames right across the road from each other, pointing in roughly the same direction, except one is directed more across the road and one is pointing more down the road, any way long story short we need to create more separation and mood to the scene and have many 4 x 4 floppy's and 2 x 6 cutters. Since a substantial amount of light is needed to be lost from one side of the diffusion frame and the fact that the more diffused a source is the harder it is to dramatically cut it, is there a better way besides basic flagging to control extremely flooded light from a big diffusion frame?

 

Thanks


  • 0

#2 Jaron Berman

Jaron Berman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 176 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • New York, NY

Posted 07 February 2018 - 09:35 AM

LCR grids, "fabric egg crates", lighttools grids - Most grip houses will carry the usual sizes like 8x8, kinda like an instant directionality to your 8x without adding much depth (about 2-3").  The angles tend to be relatively accurate if you're flying the frame flat like a door, butterfly it tends to get a little tighter pattern at the edges as the grid wants to slump in the middle.  Placing flags in front of that directional 8x can further help separate certain areas, so you get the full "bang" of the frame but with clever placement of flags you can only "show" parts of it at a time using parallax.


  • 1

#3 Robin R Probyn

Robin R Probyn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2101 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Tokyo

Posted 07 February 2018 - 09:46 AM

Posted these pics on another thread.. the same problem as you .. large soft source that needed control .. but for green screen.. and these grids worked incredibly well.. Im sure they dont have to honey comb.. but a deep enough grid really helps alot..

Attached Images

  • IMG_5686.JPG
  • IMG_5680.JPG

  • 1

#4 Seth Baldwin

Seth Baldwin
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 39 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Australia

Posted 07 February 2018 - 09:47 AM

awesome guys, thanks for that. I'll contact the rental house


  • 0

#5 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 12064 posts
  • Other

Posted 07 February 2018 - 10:34 AM

You know, reading this thread, I wonder if one of the things about the hexes is that they don't sag so much.


  • 1

#6 Ryan Emanuel

Ryan Emanuel
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts
  • Other

Posted 07 February 2018 - 11:13 AM

It depends on how much room you have between the source and the edge of frame.  Egg crates can work and would be easiest, but know that your output will reduced.  Also make sure the degree of the eggcrate will create the desired effect. An alternative would be if you have the room for a 12x8 or even better a 16x8 sider of black that will probably the trick as long as that doesn't enter frame.  Common misconception that a sider of the same size as the diffusion will be able to fully control the spill.  It all depends on the angle, some times you need a sider twice as big as the diff frame to control it.   


  • 0

#7 Albion Hockney

Albion Hockney
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 472 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • LA

Posted 07 February 2018 - 11:45 AM

^ exactly. Eggcrate is usually used for tighter spaces. It gives the illusion of a big soft source far away that is flagged off on the sides.... but if you have big sources far away you can just use big solids. 


  • 0

#8 Seth Baldwin

Seth Baldwin
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 39 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Australia

Posted 07 February 2018 - 03:19 PM

What you guys reckon, just a 4x4 floppy and a cutter will do the trick?
  • 0

#9 Robin R Probyn

Robin R Probyn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2101 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Tokyo

Posted 07 February 2018 - 07:45 PM

Yes you would still need flags too..with the grid..Im not saying that.. but it does help alot..(we had a ton of space).. compared to without ..with big enough lights... the amount of light being cut by the grid was minimal .. thats really only a concern with small lights..

 

Yes I guess Hex maybe is less prone to sagging.. must be some reason they went with that design.. it was pretty firmly clamped onto its own frame about 10cm deep..  the whole thing on wheels.. genius..


  • 0


CineLab

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Glidecam

The Slider

Visual Products

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC