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Filming on a boat


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#1 jbraver

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Posted 07 July 2005 - 03:34 PM

I am filming a short on miniDV. There are scenes on a ferry, What are the do's and don'ts of shooting on a boat.



thanks ,

jake
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#2 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 07 July 2005 - 03:39 PM

Don't drop the camera in the water ! :lol:
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#3 jbraver

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Posted 07 July 2005 - 03:45 PM

thanks :)


i guess i should clarify. How does one go about shooting on a boat. Tripod? Handheld?
I dont want anyone getting seasick watching it.

jake
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#4 Bob Hayes

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Posted 07 July 2005 - 04:03 PM

A ferry tends to be a pretty stable platform and a tripod should work well. Smaller boats and sail boats often require handheld work. Check out ?White Squall? and ?Wind? for some good boat footage.

I find the first thing I like to do when filming on a boat is get off the boat. Find a chase boat and shoot boat to boat. Shoot some long lens boat bys from a dock.

When working on a boat it is very important to keep your gear compact and organized. You are going to hand carry your gear and a lot of cases spread out will kill you. I try to number my cases 1 of 20 for example. Think about water proof cases and or tarps because there will be spray.

Boats often have 110 AC so you may want to bring a small light and some gels in case you get a great sunset.

Also don?t drop your camera in the water.
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#5 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 07 July 2005 - 04:12 PM

"I try to number my cases 1 of 20 for example. "

Come on, Bob, he's shooting mini DV, 1 of 2 should be okay...

It's true ferries are quite stable unless hard weather, if you want to have smooth stable shots keeping the horizon flat we could suggest a gyro head, but since it's mini DV, a tripod should be okay...
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#6 jbraver

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Posted 07 July 2005 - 04:36 PM

thanks so much. i was worried if i locked down the camera when the boat moves and the horizon bounces it would make people seasick

jake
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#7 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 07 July 2005 - 04:51 PM

An old film school rule says: keep the horizon level, even if the boat rocks - 'cause that's the way the human eye/body behaves in a rocking sea. However, for effect, this rule can (and often is) broken for dramatic purposes.
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#8 Algis Kemezys

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Posted 29 July 2005 - 10:14 AM

I found the flatter the bottom of the boat the better. If the curvature is to round then the boat tends to really squirm. Shooting from shore near by helps as well for certain footages. I would also get a gyroscope for the camera. This would help immensely.

Edited by Algis Kemezys, 29 July 2005 - 10:15 AM.

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#9 Algis Kemezys

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Posted 29 July 2005 - 10:17 AM

Lady of the Lake
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Aerial Filmworks

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