Jump to content


Photo

Recordable DVD's, does Kodak sell them?


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Alessandro Machi

Alessandro Machi
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3318 posts
  • Other
  • California

Posted 07 July 2005 - 08:50 PM

A year ago I was still being primarily asked to make VHS copies from BetaCam SP Edit masters that I make for my clients. One year later and I'm now making 85 percent DVDs and 15 percent VHS.

When I recently bought a hundred stack of recordable DVDs the name "FujiFilm" was on the label. As far as I know Fuji doesn't support Super-8, but Kodak does. Where can I buy Kodak recordable DVDs, and if I cannot, then why does Fuji sell recordable DVDs while Kodak does not?

We are in the day and age where $100 dollars worth of Kodachrome Super-8 film could generate several thousand DVD copies via DVD distribution. If those recordable DVDs that we buy are made by Kodak, (or fuji if you buy Fuji film for your film productions) then Kodak (as Fuji currently does) would receive downstream revenue from their film products.

I just bought 100 sheets of Kodak Photo Inkjet Paper ( I went through the whole 100 sheets in less than two days) and I use those for the album cover inserts for certain DVD jobs that require it. The Kodak Photo Inkjet Paper can be considered downstream revenue that comes from film origination projects. But heck, even if the DVD project was not film originated, it's still good to see Kodak make revenue from the exploding recordable DVD market, no?
  • 0

#2 Matt Pacini

Matt Pacini
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1246 posts

Posted 11 July 2005 - 01:27 PM

I find it bizarre that you somehow link who's making DVD's to who's supporting Super 8, as if there's some logical connection.
Hundreds of companies make recordable DVD's.
One company makes Super 8 film, and yet you single them out for criticism with strange conspiracy theories, as if they somehow are AGAINST Super 8!
THEY ARE THE ONLY COMPANY MAKING SUPER 8 FILM.
Thank them, don't rail against them.
Besides, why would you care if your DVD's are Kodak brand?

MP
  • 0

#3 Alessandro Machi

Alessandro Machi
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3318 posts
  • Other
  • California

Posted 11 July 2005 - 02:10 PM

I find it bizarre that you somehow link who's making DVD's to who's supporting Super 8, as if there's some logical connection.
Hundreds of companies make recordable DVD's.
One company makes Super 8 film, and yet you single them out for criticism with strange conspiracy theories, as if they somehow are AGAINST Super 8!
THEY ARE THE ONLY COMPANY MAKING SUPER 8 FILM.
Thank them, don't rail against them.
Besides, why would you care if your DVD's are Kodak brand?

MP

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I'm not railing against Kodak, I'm encouraging Kodak to sell recordable DVDs because as a filmmaker, I would show my support for Kodak by buying their recordable DVD products. I'm in the process of determining how many DVD copies I'll probably purchase in one years time in conjunction with the editing services I provide.

At the very least I'll probably generate 200 DVD copies a month to perhaps as many as 500 that directly relate to the editing services I provide for my clients. Over the course of one year's time, that is anywhere from 2400 to 6000 recordable DVDs that I'll be purchasing. I pay on average 67 cents per inkjet printable DVD.

In one years time, I'll most likely spend between $1,600 to $4,000 dollars on recordable DVDs. I'd rather purchase Kodak recordable DVDs to help Kodak's bottom line, if Kodak actually made recordable DVDs because Kodak makes Super-8 film. I also use Kodak 8x10 Inkjet Printable sheets for the insert sheets that slide underneath the transparent album front covers. I most likely should be purchasing another $400.00 to $1,000.00 every year in Kodak Ink Jet Printable Sheets.

I most likely will end up spending between $2,000 to $5,000 dollars on DVD related products on annual basis. LOL, I can pretty much guarantee that I won't have the time to spend that kind of money on Super-8 film stock, yet I'd like to support Kodak and I think the recordable DVD market is a huge market presently being missed by Kodak. We haven't even gotten into the possibility of Kodak inks as well.

By the way, I appreciate your responding to this topic. I don't understand why people who shoot film aren't more passionate about supporting and purchasing other Kodak products, especially if those purchases could be directly linked to filmmakers who also purchase film.
  • 0

#4 Scot McPhie

Scot McPhie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 211 posts

Posted 11 July 2005 - 02:32 PM

As admirable as it is - I wouldn't buy them just because Kodak made them - I'd do a bit of research and and only buy the most reliable brand.

There's a big difference in reliability and playability between the best and worst blank dvd's on the market. I'm not saying Kodak's are bad or good - you'd like to think having a big name Kodak's would be good (and hopefully they are) but the name alone won't necessarily guarantee it - there are only a handful of blank dvd manufacturers worldwide and alot of companies just buy them from these manufacturers and rebrand them as their own.

It would pay to do some research - in Australia there was a review a while ago about this by PC User magazine and TDK and Maxell came out on top - Laser was one of the worst - no mention of Kodak from memory as (I think) they only looked at the ones straight from the manufacturer - not from resellers who had rebranded them.

Can anyone confirm/clarify this is what Kodak do - and if so which manufacturer do they use and how good are they?

Scot
  • 0

#5 Alessandro Machi

Alessandro Machi
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3318 posts
  • Other
  • California

Posted 11 July 2005 - 03:11 PM

Well, Kodak's inkjet photo paper is excellent.

My concern is that I don't think Kodak is in the Recordable DVD industry. Yet Kodak's film products result in literally 100's of millions of DVDs being made on a yearly basis, why wouldn't Kodak want a peice of that?

And it's especially important for filmmakers who shoot film to buy their DVD products from film companies and to let their sales reps know it as well.

I do agree that I wouldn't blindly buy Kodak recordable DVD, but I would assume that if Kodak got into the recordable dVD market that their product would be excellent.
  • 0

#6 Scot McPhie

Scot McPhie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 211 posts

Posted 12 July 2005 - 04:29 AM

Well, Kodak's inkjet photo paper is excellent.

My concern is that I don't think Kodak is in the Recordable DVD industry.  Yet Kodak's film products result in literally 100's of millions of DVDs being made on a yearly basis, why wouldn't Kodak want a peice of that?

And it's especially important for filmmakers who shoot film to buy their DVD products from film companies and to let their sales reps know it as well.

I do agree that I wouldn't blindly buy Kodak recordable DVD, but I would assume that if Kodak got into the recordable dVD market that their product would be excellent.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I think you've got good logic Allesandro - you just need to make sure that Kodak will funnel some of the proceeds into it's film division - they clearly cut K40 because it wasn't holding it's own - though if push came to shove and they could afford it you'd have to think they would prop up their film business with digital sales if they had to (I hope they do - film is fun!)

Scot
  • 0

#7 Alessandro Machi

Alessandro Machi
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3318 posts
  • Other
  • California

Posted 12 July 2005 - 09:32 PM

I think you've got good logic Allesandro - you just need to make sure that Kodak will funnel some of the proceeds into it's film division - they clearly cut K40 because it wasn't holding it's own - though if push came to shove and they could afford it you'd have to think they would prop up their film business with digital sales if they had to (I hope they do - film is fun!)

Scot

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



And yet, it's not necessarily propping up the film division. It can be perceived that way, and to some extent it sounds digital is propping film up, but consider this example.

Marie Calendar Restaurant sells strawberry pies for a nice profit and their market is growing, but the strawberry farms they purchase from barely make a profit. Is Marie Calander's propping up the strawberry farm, or is it that the two entities are just a great tandem and both benefit from the existence of the other?

Remember the slogan I want my MTV?

I want my Kodak DVD!









(edit note, I corrected the spelling of the word "Restaurant")
  • 0

#8 Scot McPhie

Scot McPhie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 211 posts

Posted 12 July 2005 - 10:09 PM

And yet, it's not necessarily propping up the film division.  It can be perceived that way, and to some extent it sounds digital is propping film up, but consider this example.

Marie Calendar Resturants sells strawberry pies for a nice profit and their market is growing, but the strawberry farms they purchase from barely make a profit.  Is Marie Calander's propping up the strawberry farm, or is it that the two entities are just a great tandem and both benefit from the existence of the other?

Remember the slogan I want my MTV?

I want my Kodak DVD!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Yeah but barely making a pofit isn't the same as making an outright loss - if Kodak use their digital arm to prop up their Super 8 arm - too cool I reckon - and in reality that may be the only way Super8 ends up remaining manufactured (save whatever the hobbyists can produce from time to time).

It'd be better if it remains profitable in it's won right (it's longevity would be more ensured) but if it has to be done this way I don't care.

Scot
  • 0


CineTape

Glidecam

Opal

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Opal

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc