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tiffen "chocolate 1" filter


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#1 serra

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 01:58 AM

hi all

i just came off a shoot where i compensated tiffen's "chocolate 1"
filter with a 1 1/3 stop exposure increase. is that what everybody
else uses? what's tiffen's official compensation value? i'm asking
because i had to determine this on-the-fly using my light meter...
i haven't seen the results and i would love to know if i'm more or less
on target...

thanks and cheers,

tom


ps: i can't seem to find this info on the tiffen website... just in case
you're wondering...
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#2 Tomas Koolhaas

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 02:23 AM

Hello,
I've never used a chocolate1 but 1 1/3 seems like a lot for a coloured filter (even though chocolate is pretty dark) but then again as I said I wouldn't know for sure as I've never used one. Did you take the difusing globe off your incident meter to check the filter factor? if so you should have gotten it close enough to be OK for your exposure, another thing you can do on set is to take a reading through the filter with your spot meter aswell just to double check your readings.
Cheers.
Tomas.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 11:00 AM

Sounds right to me -- a lot of those "brown" filters have a high filter factor. I think even the lightest Antique Suede loses one stop.
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#4 Thomas Cousin

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 05:35 PM

hello,
according to tests and measurements i did a while ago with different colored filter, i agree with the 1 stop 1/3 compensation. but when compensated totally, you seem to not have a strong "chocolate" effect.
the #2 seems to take 2 stops 1/3
and the #3 seems to take 3 stops - 3stops 1/3.
bye.

thomas
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#5 serra

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Posted 12 July 2005 - 02:09 PM

hello

thanks for your responses... by now i've seen the footage and
everything turned out okay... whew!

cheers everyone!
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#6 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 12 July 2005 - 04:51 PM

If I am ever unsure of filter exposure compensation, I stick the meter in a locked position and measure with incident ball recessed with no filter then with filter - and measure the difference

I find my Tiffen polas need 1.7 of a stop - which I dial into my meter as -1.7

Is this the best way of doing things?

thanks

Rolfe
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 12 July 2005 - 11:21 PM

If I am ever unsure of filter exposure compensation, I stick the meter in a locked position and measure with incident ball recessed with no filter then with filter - and measure the difference

I find my Tiffen polas need 1.7 of a stop - which I dial into my meter as -1.7

Is this the best way of doing things?

thanks

Rolfe

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


That's how I do it.
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#8 Elliott Balsley

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 04:13 PM

This might be slightly off-topic, but can anyone give me any references of footage or films shot with a chocolate filter? I'm considering using one for the first time this weekend, but want to be sure of how it will look. Any major films I've heard of that used one?
Thanks.
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#9 Elliott Balsley

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 04:39 PM

I should have mentioned: The reason I'm thinking chocolate is that this film is set in the 1930's, and I want an old look. The director is worried about locking in anything right now, and wants to do it in post. Any thoughts about that?
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#10 James Martin

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 06:00 PM

I should have mentioned: The reason I'm thinking chocolate is that this film is set in the 1930's, and I want an old look. The director is worried about locking in anything right now, and wants to do it in post. Any thoughts about that?


Well, a Chocolate 1 is pretty mild (I have one) and if it's the same one I think it is, then you'd barely notice it was there - so that may appease him/her. From my end, I could go on forever about the desire to decide on a look as early as you can, to allow the DoP to work for it, but many DoPs these days prefer to leave it to post. At least, the ones I have spoken to do.

Perhaps you can persuade him to do a test? Your camera company should let you test the kit for a couple days, why not fire off some footage?
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#11 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 07:12 PM

I should have mentioned: The reason I'm thinking chocolate is that this film is set in the 1930's, and I want an old look. The director is worried about locking in anything right now, and wants to do it in post. Any thoughts about that?


If this is a student film, then tell the director not to be a wuss ;)

What is he worried about, that he might actually nail the look he wants right off the bat? No guts, no glory... the whole point of being a student is to try things and learn, what do you learn if you don't try anything and save it all for post? Is he going to have the actors deliver twenty different performances so he can pick one in post? Art is all about making choices, not avoiding them.

"Lost Highway" was shot with a Chocolate filter. I think "Run, Lola, Run" was shot with Chocolate filters instead of 85's, but I might be misremembering that.
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