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Diffusion for portraits


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#1 AlejandroGomez

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 09:15 AM

 Hi!

 

Since now I was just working with practicals, "being lucky" to catch the light. I want to change this and learn more about diffusion and control of the light, things like position, distance and specifically kind of fabrics like: silk, muslim, grid cloth and all this stuff.

 

Any links, articles or books to get really deep in this topic?

 

Another question is about a lighting setup from one of my favorites commercial DOP (Khalid Mohtaseb), I do really love his work and his treatment of the light. Any insights on how he achieved this light?

 

 

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#2 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 10:43 AM

Maybe not portraits.. but I shoot alot of interviews.. re soft light.. there is one fundamental rule.. softness of the light is always governed by size of source ratio to subject.. putting diffusion straight onto a say a 1x1 lite panel will not make it a soft light..(in your average head and shoulders shot).. you would have to make the source bigger.. eg a soft box/diffusion frame.. the front of the box /frame becomes the new source .. bigger the source size to subject, softer the light... down side is you light up the whole room and the background .. soft light is harder to control.. or shoot in a very big room .. usually a good idea anyway..  if you have a diffusion frame.. then you want to fill that frame as evenly as possible.. if space is tight you can do that by bouncing light into your diff frame.. ie a book light.. it fills the diff better but not intrinsically softer than going direct but moving the light back far enough to do the same thing.. fill the frame evenly..

 

As your example shows.. its often a "nicer"look , to light from the opposite axis to the lens.. rather than flat on.. not a rule, but for what ever reasons seems to be pleasing to the eye.. that could be any soft light..  through a frame or a  soft box..  its a pretty close shot..so it could be a relatively small light/softbox/frame.. but close to his face..or a much bigger source farther away..

 

Sorry if you already know all this.. !


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#3 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 03:04 PM

Another question is about a lighting setup from one of my favorites commercial DOP (Khalid Mohtaseb), I do really love his work and his treatment of the light. Any insights on how he achieved this light?

 

It's a relatively soft source, coming from a back 3/4 position (relative to camera). It's on a level with his eyeline, and it's underexposed by at least a stop. Without seeing the rest of the scene, it's hard to say much more about it. It could be coming from a practical source, or from a lamp out of shot.


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#4 Michael LaVoie

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 06:41 PM

China silk is a great fabric you can get from Matthews. Nice to use in a booklight as described above.


Edited by Michael LaVoie, 19 March 2018 - 06:52 PM.

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#5 JD Hartman

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 07:17 PM

China silk is a great fabric you can get from Matthews. Nice to use in a booklight as described above.

 

I didn't think "real" silk, China silk was ever used anymore due to cost and its ease of being damaged.  All the silks, I've ever owned or handled were artificial, Rayon or Viscose.


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#6 Miguel Angel

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 01:53 AM

Probably it is artificial too but China Silk is very much used across Europe in every set.
I always ask for it.

Also.. somebody should make a diffusion silk with the density of Opal!

Have a lovely day!
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#7 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 08:33 AM

My China silks are all spun on the thighs of virgins.. in a monastery high in the mountains near Mongolia ..I cant of course give any details... I hike with trusty sherpa,s 3 months to get there.. and 3 months back to my lodgings .. living off berries on the trail..


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#8 Matt Thomas

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 10:56 AM

My silks are always organically sourced and locally bleached with the nectar of hand grown greenery from area artisans. It produces the most cinematic and filmic image. 


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#9 Miguel Angel

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 06:44 PM

My China silks are all spun on the thighs of virgins.. in a monastery high in the mountains near Mongolia ..I cant of course give any details... I hike with trusty sherpa,s 3 months to get there.. and 3 months back to my lodgings .. living off berries on the trail..

My silks are always organically sourced and locally bleached with the nectar of hand grown greenery from area artisans. It produces the most cinematic and filmic image.


Hahaha.
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#10 Michael LaVoie

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 06:56 PM

"China silk" is or was an actual name in the Matthews catalog I believe.  I doubt "Hampshire frost" is made in Hampshire.  Lots of odd names for film gear.  Almost a given.


Edited by Michael LaVoie, 20 March 2018 - 06:57 PM.

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#11 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 08:01 AM

"China silk" is or was an actual name in the Matthews catalog I believe.  I doubt "Hampshire frost" is made in Hampshire.  Lots of odd names for film gear.  Almost a given.

 

 

What ! now you tell me !.. 


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#12 JD Hartman

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 08:35 PM

"China silk" is or was an actual name in the Matthews catalog I believe.  I doubt "Hampshire frost" is made in Hampshire.  Lots of odd names for film gear.  Almost a given.

 

No, China silk is actual silk fabric woven from silk thread.  It's not a slang term or a trade name owned by Matthews or any other company.

http://www.advantage...cifications.htm


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#13 Gerald King

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Posted 22 April 2018 - 12:46 PM

what commercial is this?

 

 Hi!

 

Since now I was just working with practicals, "being lucky" to catch the light. I want to change this and learn more about diffusion and control of the light, things like position, distance and specifically kind of fabrics like: silk, muslim, grid cloth and all this stuff.

 

Any links, articles or books to get really deep in this topic?

 

Another question is about a lighting setup from one of my favorites commercial DOP (Khalid Mohtaseb), I do really love his work and his treatment of the light. Any insights on how he achieved this light?

 

 


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Technodolly

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC