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Lighting for 100T


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#1 Freya Black

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 06:06 AM

Although 100T would have once been considered a fairly fast film, it seems kind of slow by todays standards. I'm wondering what kind of lighting would actualy be needed to film on 100T?

If I was to do such a thing it would be using standard mains power here in the u.k.

Does this seem completely impractical? Any suggestions?

love

Freya
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 07:20 AM

Although 100T would have once been considered a fairly fast film, it seems kind of slow by todays standards. I'm wondering what kind of lighting would actualy be needed to film on 100T?

If I was to do such a thing it would be using standard mains power here in the u.k.

Does this seem completely impractical? Any suggestions?

love

Freya

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Hi,

You won't have any problems. If your lenses are T1.4 you could work with practicals! With 500 ASA candlelight is enough!
With an 85 filter, outside in the sun would be around T16!

Stephen Williams DP
Zurich

www.stephenw.com
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 10:47 AM

I shot a number of short films in 16mm using 100T stock indoors at night and just house powered movie lights. It's not a problem if the rooms are small and your lens is fast.

It can be a problem if you are relying on lots of low-level natural light or need to light larger spaces.

There's also 200T stock...
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#4 Bob Hayes

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 12:13 PM

You'll find that you have to light with harder light to get the stop. With 500 ASA you might key a scene with a 1k bounced in foam core with a single in it. With 100 ASA you might have to go direct with the 1K. One of the reason films from 30 years ago are harder lit.
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#5 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 01:27 PM

Hi,

In the UK you do have the major advantage of being able to run a 2.5K HMI from any mains socket.

On 200 speed stock, I just about got a 2.0 dead with a 2.5K HMI bounced into a 4x4 at a range of about 6 feet. The other angle was a 2.8 with an Arri 1K, a 650, and a 300 fired straight at the cast. Half the speed equals twice the light, so you'll probably be relying heavily on HMI for efficiency and it won't be easy.

I wouldn't bother; get some faster film.

Phil
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 01:58 PM

I don't know about that -- like I said, I shot a number of short films with 100T generally lighting faces with a 1K through a 4x4 diffusion frame of 216 and got an f/2.8. But I'm talking about small rooms like bedrooms.

I also lit a kitchen scene with a Chinese Lantern with a 500 watt photoflood and got a f/2.8 at 100T, so it is certainly possible.

But this was before 200T stock was available, which I would tend to favor for 16mm, even over Vision-2 500T. It's worth the extra work to use a slower film stock, within reason. I'm not a believer in just using the fastest stock possible to make everything easier to light.
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#7 Stephen Williams

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 02:14 PM

I don't know about that -- like I said, I shot a number of short films with 100T generally lighting faces with a 1K through a 4x4 diffusion frame of 216 and got an f/2.8. But I'm talking about small rooms like bedrooms. 

I also lit a kitchen scene with a Chinese Lantern with a 500 watt photoflood and got a f/2.8 at 100T, so it is certainly possible.

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Hi,

I think the new Kodak 5212/7212 is beautiful. Every time I use faster film I usually end up adding ND filters.

Stephen
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#8 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 03:13 PM

On 200 speed stock, I just about got a 2.0 dead with a 2.5K HMI bounced into a 4x4 at a range of about 6 feet

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How far was the HMI from the 4x4? T2.0 seems very low...
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#9 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 05:58 PM

Hi,

> How far was the HMI from the 4x4

Not far at all, a matter of a few feet.

The same HMI also looked slightly greenish, both in reality and on film. It was most odd.

Phil
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#10 John Mastrogiacomo

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 02:41 AM

The same HMI also looked slightly greenish, both in reality and on film. It was most odd.

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It is most likely the globe. My buddy owns a lighting and grip company and he marks each HMI as to how green they are, so he can apply the correct gel to correct the problem. :)
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