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A brief intro...and then a question


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#1 Justin Oakley

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Posted 02 May 2018 - 05:44 PM

Hello there,
I joined this forum because I figured it would be a good place to ask questions and maybe learn a thing or two. But cruising through some of these threads I realized that I may be in waaaay over my head here.

I am NOT a professional. I cant emphasize this enough. Im a full time fireman. But Ive been geeking out on this stuff pretty hard lately. Whenever I find something I like doing I go all the way and it consumes a lot, if not all, of my spare time (even at work).

What little Ive done has been a one man operation, shooting, editing, sound, lights, etc. I take my modest little DSLR and other miscellaneous gear out and pretty much just go for it...guerrilla style, if you will. Learning as I go. No film school or anything. YouTube University is pretty much the extent of my education. And the only real set experience I have is doing odds and ends PA stuff, helping with lighting, moving gear around, and asking dumb questions without getting in the way too much. Ill get on social media, find local independent/student film groups, and essentially ask them if they need help from a guy willing to learn. Im starting to get a grasp of the language and rhythm of a movie set too. Good stuff.

Anyway...thats me.

So I guess my first question is this:
is there a place here for low/no budget filmmaking discussions? A place for amateurs such as myself? I had some questions about lighting, specifically image noise, and I kind of pulled the reigns when I saw people discussing ARRI cameras and whatnot. I just dont want to go staggering around here like a dizzy idiot annoying people with my petty questions, making a jerk out of myself.

Thanks guys

Edited by Justin Oakley, 02 May 2018 - 05:45 PM.

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#2 Justin Oakley

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Posted 02 May 2018 - 05:48 PM

Apologies.

I probably shouldve posted this in the INTRODUCTION section. Im already off to a great start.

Sorry about that
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#3 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 02 May 2018 - 06:05 PM

You're fine. Techniques of lighting, blocking, framing and production design are identical regardless of what you're shooting on. In fact, I'm barely old enough to reminisce about things, but modern cameras (such as your DSLR) are much closer to the high end than the stuff we had even 15 years ago.

 

This is also slightly depressing, because it quickly becomes clear that the camera isn't stopping you producing Holllywood-looking stuff, it's just... knowledge and experience.


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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 02 May 2018 - 06:14 PM

I'll also add that even on the bigger budgeted stuff sometimes the "right" tool isn't some new skypanel 15^10x6..25 light which costs the GDP of Luxembourg, but something as simple as a bit of white card here, or there. So I'd say ask away in the appropriate sections, laying out exactly what you have and those of us who can will chime in and give our 2 cents.

for my, personally, I much enjoy the challenge of working with less.


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#5 Justin Oakley

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Posted 02 May 2018 - 06:34 PM

You're fine. Techniques of lighting, blocking, framing and production design are identical regardless of what you're shooting on. In fact, I'm barely old enough to reminisce about things, but modern cameras (such as your DSLR) are much closer to the high end than the stuff we had even 15 years ago.
 
This is also slightly depressing, because it quickly becomes clear that the camera isn't stopping you producing Holllywood-looking stuff, it's just... knowledge and experience.


Yes! Thats the word Ive gotten.
It doesnt matter which high speed/low drag gear you have. Although Im sure it matters to a certain extent, for obvious reasons. But apparently, the hallmark of a good filmmaker is their ability to make awesome stuff with less.

And Im sure there are plenty of boring, not-so-good movies that were produced with outrageous budgets.
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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 02 May 2018 - 06:36 PM

waterworld . .  (though i liked it)


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#7 Justin Oakley

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Posted 02 May 2018 - 06:47 PM

And thanks guys.

Ill poke around and try to find the appropriate sections for my novice questions.
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Willys Widgets

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Visual Products

Tai Audio

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

CineLab

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS