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lights?


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#1 mnpd

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 10:55 AM

I am shooting on dvcam and most of the scenes to be shot are set in a living room (small) the director wants a "nil by mouth" type of lighting could anyone please give me some advice? Nil by mouth is the film by Gary Oldman :)

thanks in advance

Tony
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#2 Tim J Durham

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 12:08 PM

I am shooting on dvcam and most of the scenes to be shot are set in a living room (small) the director wants a "nil by mouth" type of lighting could anyone please give me some advice? Nil by mouth is the film by Gary Oldman  :)

thanks in advance

Tony

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Haven't seen it but judging from these prod. photos:

http://pro.imdb.com/...92/photogallery

looks like soft overheads (like the Godfather without the gold filter), strong edge lights, keying from the reverse (4:00 and 8:00) with underexposed warm fill in the shot of the two people talking to each other.

I'd have him grab some stills from the DVD to give you an exact idea what he wants. Looks pretty eclectic to me.
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#3 mnpd

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 03:57 PM

Haven't seen it but judging from these prod. photos:

http://pro.imdb.com/...92/photogallery

looks like soft overheads (like the Godfather without the gold filter), strong edge lights, keying from the reverse (4:00 and 8:00) with underexposed warm fill in the shot of the two people talking to each other.

I'd have him grab some stills from the DVD to give you an exact idea what he wants. Looks pretty eclectic to me.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Thanks for the quick reply but could you explain it in lehmans terms as i am a student still learning the trade?what do you mean by the 4:oo & 8:00 i am not a member of imdb so can not see the shot that you are looking at! also strong edge lights ?

sorry i no that may sound a bit dumb but i am still a keen newbie

Thanks in advance

Tony :)
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 04:09 PM

We're not connected in any way with the IMDB, but it appears you have to join this IMDB Professionals site to access these pictures. I couldn't access them either.
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#5 anamexis

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 09:29 PM

4:00 and 8:00 refer to angles like those on a clock with 12:00 being directly forward. (So 6:00 would be backwards, 3:00 your right and 9:00 your left.)
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#6 Tim J Durham

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 09:37 PM

Thanks for the quick reply but could you explain it in lehmans terms as i am a student still learning the trade?what do you mean by the 4:oo & 8:00 i am not a member of imdb so can not see the shot that you are looking at! also strong edge lights ?

sorry i no that may sound a bit dumb but i am still a keen newbie

Thanks in advance

Tony :)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Whoops, I think you are right. I took a trial membership quite a while ago and I guess they never cancelled me. Hopefully they never will, it's a great source of info.

Anyway, by 4:00 and 8:00 I am describing a system to tell where the lights are set. If two people are facing each other, the point in between them is the center of the clockface. The camera at 12:00. The two people are at 3:00 and 9:00, so the person at 9:00 is keyed from a point roughly at 4:00 and the person at 3:00 is keyed from 8:00. Which doesn't mean much if you can't see the photos.

So my suggestion to you is:
Watch the film with the director and get some screen grabs which are lit the way he likes. Then you post those screen grabs and people here can tell you how the lighting was done.

That's the best way to get the help you seek as I suspect many (me for instance) have not seen the film and I see ALOT of movies.
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#7 Daniel J. Ashley-Smith

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Posted 12 July 2005 - 11:28 AM

Sorry, Tony, I know this is your thread asking a completely diffirent question but I just wanted to ask a quick question, I didn't think creating a whole new topic was practical for such a simple question:

When they say "variable beam" (Link) Do they mean variable as in you can change the direction of the light beam or the power?

Thanks a lot,
Dan.
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#8 drew_town

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Posted 12 July 2005 - 12:04 PM

Sorry, Tony, I know this is your thread asking a completely diffirent question but I just wanted to ask a quick question, I didn't think creating a whole new topic was practical for such a simple question:

When they say "variable beam" (Link) Do they mean variable as in you can change the direction of the light beam or the power?

Thanks a lot,
Dan.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I think they mean the ability to flood or spot.
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#9 Tim van der Linden

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Posted 13 July 2005 - 03:12 AM

Here's a link to the pictures for those (like me) who don't have the pro subscription:

http://www.imdb.com/...92/photogallery
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