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Kodachrome 16mm 400ft rolls?? Do they exist?


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#1 kalkarman

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Posted 13 July 2005 - 05:11 AM

Do 16mm 400ft (122 mt) Kodachrome rolls exist? If so:

1) where's the closest place I can buy rolls & process? (I'm in Milan Italy)
2) what ASA's are available.

Technically: Can someone tell me why kodachrome FEELS different than, say, our vision stocks of today? What technology is going on inside kodachrome? Tips & Tricks related only to Kodachrome?

Many Thanks,

Kal Karman
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 13 July 2005 - 11:15 AM

Kodachrome uses K-14 processing. The only motion picture stock is K40 7270, which is 40 ASA and tungsten-balanced (so 25 ASA in daylight with an 85 filter.)

http://www.kodak.com...1.4.4.6.6&lc=en

There are only two places in the world that can process it, Dwayne's Photo in Kansas and a place in Switzerland.

Dwayne's:
http://k14movies.com/

I think the place in Europe is Kodak Processing Laboratories, Case Postale Ch-1001, Lausanne, Switzerland -- but they may be shutting down K-14 processing.

In Italy, there is a Kodak rep in Rome and Milan that you can buy the film through. Go to the Kodak website for info.

According to their catalog, they don't sell it in 400' rolls. They sell it in 100' daylight spools or by special order, a 1000' roll which you would have to get broken up into smaller rolls yourself at a lab darkroom.

Kodachrome is the only color film to not use color coupler technology, so the film itself has no color in it -- it's three layers of b&w emulsions with filters between them. The color dyes are added in a complex 14-step processing system. This is what gives Kodachrome a somewhat unique grain structure and color texture, just as the dye transfer printing process at Technicolor used to give. Dyes that can be added later tend to be more permanent and have a certain richness, although modern E6 slide films like Ektachrome 100D have surpassed Kodachrome for saturation and are similar in graininess. But the texture of the color and grain in Kodachrome is unique.

Being only a 40 ASA film stock, though, you'd expect it to be fine-grained.

It's a color reversal stock, remember, so produces a projection-contrast positive original once developed. All the Vision and Vision-2 camera stocks are negative.
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#3 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 01:19 AM

I have enjoyed shooting Kodachrome Super-8.

Here a few tips that I think help make Kodachrome look spectacular. Contrast reduction is usually essential, I'm not saying you should use filters, just keep in mind less contras is usually a good thing when shooting Kodachrome 40.

Shoot with Blue skys if possible. If you must shoot with white skys, try shooting slightly downward angles and use backgrounds other than the white sky.

If you have control over wardrobe and make-up & hair, stay away from the pure black color. Brunette color can look like black but will help keep the brightness surrounding the black hair or clothing. Pure black seems to suck the life out of the color and light near it's vicinity.

Avoid pure white as well.

If you can follow those rules, and for the most part shoot flat, you should get a terrific looking image.
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#4 Sam Wells

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 01:37 PM

Contrast reduction is usually essential, I'm not saying you should use filters, just keep in mind less contrast is usually a good thing when shooting Kodachrome 40.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


If it's *that* essential why not shoot 7245 or Vision series negative instead ?

I think Kodachrome beautifully compliments high contrast situations, the highlights cut like a knife hrough shadow.

(How to print that now is another story :D )

-Sam
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