Jump to content



Photo

Cameras suitable in order to pitch/sell to Netflix, etc


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 Mario Bosanac

Mario Bosanac
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 04 August 2018 - 06:07 PM

Hello all!

 

So a client of mine wants to exercise the idea of filming on acceptable cameras in order to possible push the show to Netflix and other channels if they decide to.

 

I came across this:

https://partnerhelp....d-Image-Capture

 

and this:

http://www.reduser.n...5502202ab983083

 

My question is, how strict are they on recording formats and settings? I plan to shoot with a Canon C300 or so. If anyone has any insight on this, please let me know!

 

Thanks! Film long and prosper! 


Edited by Mario Bosanac, 04 August 2018 - 06:14 PM.

  • 0

#2 tom lombard

tom lombard
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 161 posts
  • Other
  • nebraska

Posted 04 August 2018 - 06:15 PM

Isn't that a question for the good folks at Netflix?  "How strict are you on recording formats and settings?"


  • 0

#3 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7496 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 04 August 2018 - 06:25 PM

If you just want netflix to buy the finished product as a finished product as a distributor, you should be ok on almost any camera system so long as it's a good movie. If you are expecting them to look at you and then order the pilot from you or something like that that's a whole other story (and an unlikely one).

Your best bet would be to speak with netflix and a sales agent (probably in reverse order) to see what they recommend. You will probably have to pay the sales agent.

 

Or you know, you could just get an Alexa65 and shoot everything in Arriraw.


  • 1

#4 Reggie A Brown

Reggie A Brown
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 58 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Missouri

Posted 04 August 2018 - 06:49 PM

If the story is good enough and Netflix feel like that can make a profit from it, you can record your movie on an android phone and sell it to Netflix, they don't care! Now if Netflix is producing it, you don't have to worry about "owning" a camera, they'll give you a large enough budget to rent what ever camera package that is on their recommended camera list.
  • 0

#5 Jon O'Brien

Jon O'Brien
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 545 posts
  • Other
  • Brisbane

Posted 04 August 2018 - 07:03 PM

You could shoot on real film too. Go on, just do it. If you build it they will come ... if it's good enough.


  • 0

#6 Robin R Probyn

Robin R Probyn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2427 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Tokyo

Posted 04 August 2018 - 07:07 PM

above all true.. but I would think shooting 4K would be wise .. C300 Mk1 is only HD I think..


  • 0

#7 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7496 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 04 August 2018 - 07:10 PM

Depends on the 4K. I think a 4K final DCP would be wise, no doubt, but honestly, were I to go into almost any production, I'd want to err towards an Arri, personally, over a Red, if only to save myself a head-ache between takes (and honestly, I find an Alexa to be easier to work with--  image wise-- than a red.)

 

Does kinda depend on what the project on the whole is stylistically, but I think anything higher resolution than HD would be the right choice.


  • 1

#8 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5305 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 05 August 2018 - 07:33 AM

I suspect, it depends if you're talking about Netflix commissioning you to make the production or if they buying to screen an already made film. If it's the former, you'd have to discussions in advance with Netflix and the reasons for using anything less than their required cameras and technical specifications. With the latter, it's up to them to decide if they wish buy a number of screenings having seen the technical quality, they don't have any long term involvement and investment in the production. . 


  • 0

#9 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 12322 posts
  • Other

Posted 05 August 2018 - 11:46 AM

My understanding is that Netflix (and similar organisations) are a sales target for a lot of very dubious productions, and have put in as many barriers to access as they possibly can. They certainly don't take unsolicited material. It's hard to object - they must get absolutely deluged with unwatchable bilge - but the upshot is that there is no effective way to sell to them unless you have a significant track record and personal contacts. As such, a decent camera might be a necessary condition for selling a production to any broadcaster, but it's very far from a sufficient condition.

 

I say all this because it's quite common to encounter this sort of question from an indie filmmaker who has grand plans about selling a production to a particular outlet. If you're part of a production which is already talking to a distributor, that's great, but you should probably ask the distributor. If not, then please be very cautious about putting lots of effort into a production on the basis that an outlet will somehow be found for it. Unless you are in a very specific position as regards personal contacts and a preexisting business relationship (and you would know if you were), there is no way to sell film and TV productions to Netflix. Quite the opposite: they'll do everything they can to avoid talking to you.


  • 0

#10 Michael LaVoie

Michael LaVoie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 771 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 05 August 2018 - 03:14 PM

There's a filmtrooper podcast that's hysterical about a filmmaker who was approached by Netflix.  Someone  there saw his documentary at the Toronto film fest and approached the filmmaker expressing interest.  This employee at Netflix who was in touch with the filmmaker left Netflix shortly after without giving the director any follow up contact info for anyone else at Netflix.

 

It took the filmmaker years to get back in touch with Netflix about his movie.  Even though Netflix actually wanted it. haha.   Point is, yeah, you can't reach them. Even when they want your film you can't reach anyone there.  If you do make a contact. Make sure they give you an additional email or phone number for someone else just in case.

 

Here's a link to the site for the podcast. I think it's episode 135.  It's worth checking out.

http://filmtrooper.com


  • 0

#11 David Peterson

David Peterson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 261 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Auckland, New Zealand.

Posted 14 August 2018 - 10:29 PM

Care less about what Netflix "wants", and just shoot on the best camera for your project!


  • 1

#12 Bruce Greene

Bruce Greene
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 638 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 15 August 2018 - 07:38 AM

We've shot 720p, up scaled to 1920x1080 and it played on netflix.  If they want the movie, your distributor should be able to get it there.


  • 0

#13 Phil Connolly

Phil Connolly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 477 posts
  • Director
  • London

Posted 15 August 2018 - 03:44 PM

What Bruce said. If they like the film as long as it looks OK and they actually want it they will buy it. Even the expensive new star trek series is 1080p only on UK Netflix

 

In addition to 720p stuff on Netflix theres quite a lot of standard def Digi-Beta and Beta-SP.  Plenty of very rough looking old BBC sitcoms.

 

They made a big deal of acquiring the monty python catalogue, most of that is a mash up of 1"C format and 16mm. Format isn't barrier to purchases. There's usually a minimum technical quality they will accept - but thats not just in terms of resolution (since they will take SD). Sound quality, chroma and Luma levels, blanking etc.... I used to work in QC for a UK broadcaster/film distributor and have rejected many many television programmes and films for technical reason's. 90% it wasn't because of a substandard camera format - but usually it was due to audio problems and mistakes made in the edit. The choice of camera is far less important then your choice of sound recordist and post production team in getting a film/show past QC.

 

If you have a C300 and the film looks good - it won't be the lack of 4k that prevents a Netflix sale, more likely lack of stars and the plain of numbers game of it being a real long shot. Blue Ruin (shot on C300) was on Netflix

 

4k is only needed for a commission, at that point if they want 4k, they will give you enough money to shoot 4k and tell you what cameras are allowed.

 

As others have said use the best camera you can afford for your project. If you already have a C300 then shoot on that. But if your hiring in maybe check out the Ursa mini and Sony FS7 as well. They rent for similar amounts and may give you a bit more latitude for colour correction. I'm a bit fan of the C300 - but the 8 bit files do limit your flexibility in post. Stretching to FS7 or C300 Mk2 might make your life easier on the shoot - regardless of the Netflix rules. 


  • 0

#14 Tyler Purcell

Tyler Purcell
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4297 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 16 August 2018 - 12:36 AM

The only time Netflix requires 4k is if they're paying for the production internally. If you're selling a product to them, they only require 1080p.
  • 1


The Slider

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

CineTape

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

The Slider

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

CineLab