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Storyboards?


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#1 Jody Custer

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 04:56 PM

What is the take on storyboards. An efficient method of communication, or a waste of your time? How have storyboards helped a shoot? How much structure do you as a DP account for? How much do you expect when you arrive on-set?
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 07:22 PM

Sort of depends on if I had any input into them. Since I usually draw the storyboards for the movies I shoot, I find them very useful obviously or I wouldn't bother. But you only need to do them for special sequences; otherwise a simple shot-list is sufficient.
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#3 Robert Edge

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Posted 17 July 2005 - 01:05 PM

Edward Burns has an interesting take on this on the DVD version of Sidewalks of New York. He uses top-down drawings that show the physical environment and the movement of actors. He doesn't call them blocking diagrams, but that is essentially what they are.
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#4 Jody Custer

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Posted 18 July 2005 - 12:25 PM

I learned to draw them as small thumbnails, to minimize detail. My background is in fine arts. Drawing storyboards is making me focus on the artistic presentation of the actual drawing, trying to perfect them on paper, which in turn, changes my original vision. The film grants wanted storyboards included with presentation. The need for them was mentioned enough in several places that I got caught up creating them. So much so, that my creative process in pre-production went idle. But I have come to the conclusion that they do not work for me. In trying to get storyboards right, I realize that I am defeating the purpose of accurately realizing the shot. No storyboards for my process. I trust my eye. When shooting, I can see my shot and communicate it to my DP. On set, I see my shots. (I developed the environment, look, feel, and character, of everything the camera will shoot.) I trust it.
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#5 David Sweetman

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 03:16 PM

Well I know that you want a response from a working DP, but I have at least a small amount of advice to offer. My drawing background is in the comic-book style, so storyboards are just a short step over from that. Furthermore, my movies tend to be heavily action-oriented, and although I know generally the shots I want when I write the script, storyboards help me see exactly what I'll need. I might not follow them to a T when I'm on the set, but in terms of having the 'flow' of the scene in my mind -- that is, knowing what the viewer will need to see in order to make the sequence work -- the storyboards help tremendously.

Also, when I do draw storyboards, it's because I'm so inspired to make the movie that I want to make it immediately. Storyboards are a way that I can see some instant output of my inspiration, and in the process find cool places to put the camera that I might not have seen on the set.

Anyway that's my amateur two cents
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#6 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 05:27 PM

Hi,

I just did a short which we didn't storyboard and barely shotlisted - simply because of time constraints.

It was a huge mistake, and we missed a lot of stuff.

Phil
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#7 Mario C. Jackson

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Posted 30 August 2005 - 03:40 PM

I think story boards are very useful for a dp. Especially if he is added to a project at the very last minute. This allows he/she to see visually what is going to take place and also gives them a idea of what the director wants. I also believe that all dp's should learn how to shoot on the fly. You never know the situation that you are in.

Mario C. Jackson
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#8 shane grace

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Posted 02 September 2005 - 07:36 AM

extremely valuable!!

how else can you remember every single shot that you have to set up when your shooting?

I ask for them for every shoot - often the more detailed or well drawn - inspire my lighting even more...

Directors who dont give me a story board will then have to explain each shot individually before i set it up - this is a complete waste of production time (even if it only takes a few miniutes) - if there is a storyboard, i dont need to waste time trying to find the director / wait for he/she to finish talking on the phone etc etc..... to describe what he / she wants. You can setup two three shots in advance just by refering to the story board.

also for ordering equipment - you need to see how wide, close etc a shot is - one persons definition of 'wide' may be an 18mm while others think 'fish-eye'.

shot lists dont have the same appeal - after a few hours it just becomes a blur of text on the paper

"MC O/shoulder Jim - Mary Bkrd G-Scrn Zoom CU"
"MC O/shoulder Bob - Mary Bkrd G-Scrn Zoom CU"
"CU upside dwn Crane - O/shlder BLah Blha"

Huh???

It also gives everybody onset an idea of whats intended - again another time-saver.


Shane :)
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