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Color Correction/hues


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#1 FilmmakerJack

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Posted 18 July 2005 - 10:58 PM

After watching war of the worlds, I decided to rewatch minority report. I again fell in love with the photography. My favorite part about it is the latitude and the blue tones. Spielberg said they used a light skip-bleach effect. However, I don't see how the skip-bleach alone would give it a blueish tone. I'm trying to recreate a similar effect, but more greenish blue (like the Ring). Any thoughts how I might do this? I'm shooting digital btw. Thanks.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 18 July 2005 - 11:03 PM

Skip-bleach wouldn't give you a blue tone -- that comes with lighting with blue-ish lights or using tungsten stock outdoors uncorrected or partially corrected. I know that for "Saving Private Ryan" they used the 81EF instead of the 85B filter to get a cooler rendition on the negative when shooting outdoors.

"Minority Report" used a skip-bleach to the negative, whereas the other movies used silver retention to the prints.

Outdoors on video, you can get a very cold blue effect by using the camera's 3200K (tungsten) preset white-balance in daylight (which is 5500K). You could also white balance through a warm gel or filter, then pull the filter and get a blue-ish scene.

For a skip-bleach look, you have to be able to pull down the chroma a lot and crush the blacks and clip the whites for a more high-contrast look.
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#3 Tim J Durham

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Posted 18 July 2005 - 11:03 PM

After watching war of the worlds, I decided to rewatch minority report. I again fell in love with the photography. My favorite part about it is the latitude and the blue tones. Spielberg said they used a light skip-bleach effect. However, I don't see how the skip-bleach alone would give it a blueish tone. I'm trying to recreate a similar effect, but more greenish blue (like the Ring). Any thoughts how I might do this? I'm shooting digital btw. Thanks.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Shooting digital what? Some cameras are easier than others if you're talking about creating the look in cam as opposed to in post.
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#4 FilmmakerJack

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 12:10 AM

I'm not sure what kind of camera I'll be using. But it will most likely be a ccd consumer camera. There's a chance it may be an xl1, but I'm planning for the worst. I'm thinking most of my effects will have to be post. I'm shooting indoors, not outdoors. How might I play with the color settings then?
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#5 FilmmakerJack

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 12:30 AM

"Minority Report" used a skip-bleach to the negative, whereas the other movies used silver retention to the prints.


I know editors have an effect for the silver retention can be added in post. Is there a way I can do the skip-bleach to the negative can be done in post as well?
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 01:05 AM

I'm not sure what kind of camera I'll be using. But it will most likely be a ccd consumer camera. There's a chance it may be an xl1, but I'm planning for the worst. I'm thinking most of my effects will have to be post. I'm shooting indoors, not outdoors. How might I play with the color settings then?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


If by "indoors" you mean DAY interiors, the same tricks apply as outdoors since the natural light is 5500K, so if you set your camera to 3200K tungsten preset white balance, the image will be blue-ish.

If by "indoors" you mean NIGHT interiors with room lights on, it wouldn't look natural for them to be blue-ish, but one could cool off the color by white-balancing through an orange gel or filter and then pulling it. Or using the tungsten WB preset and then shooting with a blue filter on the lens -- or by using blue gels on lights.
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 01:09 AM

I know editors have an effect for the silver retention can be added in post. Is there a way I can do the skip-bleach to the negative can be done in post as well?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Can you ask this question any more clearly?

And skip-bleach and silver retention are the same thing; skip-bleach is one type of silver retention. Skip-bleach done to the negative blows out the whites more than crushes the blacks as when done to the print -- obviously video already has problems with hot highlights clipping so that aspect is easy to fake with video. Either way, the skip-bleach look in video is basically adding a lot of contrast and taking down a lot of the color.

By the way, we have a general policy that people should sign their posts with their real names, and hopefully list the city where they are too. You can set up a signature that automatically does this when you post.
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#8 FilmmakerJack

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 01:59 AM

Hey, sorry about that. I didn't realize I was supposed to leave a signature. Thanks for responding though!
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