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Snow in "Narnia"


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#1 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 08:31 PM

Does anyone know what kind of "Snow" they used in "the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe"? I seen in a video-documentary that it was some kind of papper or something, but it looked extremely REAL to me.

Does anyone have any information on this kind of snow (where to rent/buy equipment to make it), ect?
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#2 Tim J Durham

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 09:31 PM

Does anyone know what kind of "Snow" they used in "the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe"? I seen in a video-documentary that it was some kind of papper or something, but it looked extremely REAL to me.

Does anyone have any information on this kind of snow (where to rent/buy equipment to make it), ect?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Landon,
I believe they may have used something like this:

http://tinyurl.com/6t7om

Very time-consuming I would think.
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#3 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 10:37 PM

Ha ha ha ha ha ha, Very funny :blink: ... Somehow I doubt it though... I bet they used THIS (Click here)

Really though, somehow they did it, and it looked real. I'm wondering how they did it.... :unsure:
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#4 Gillian

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 11:10 PM

Scissors! LOL I was thinking ?hole punches? myself, but either way, poor props department!
Gillian
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#5 jeremy edge

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 12:44 AM

Maybe its a much bigger version of the machine we used which uses foam from a liquid source.It can be bought at dj supply stores.bad thing is if a big clump gets in the shot it can look really fake.

Check out some frame grabs ...some shots it looks convincing...some it doesnt.

We'll post some moving stuff soon so you can see what it looks like in motion.

http://www.extremeso...epullsindex.htm
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#6 Tim Tyler

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 10:28 AM

... that it was some kind of papper or something,


I've seen bags of a flakey paper pulp-like stuff used on set for snow. Out of the bag it's light enough to be blown around in front of big fans, and when it's wet it behaves a lot like slushy snow. Looks like a lot of work to clean up though.
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#7 Noel

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 10:56 AM

My first post, and it is going to be on snow!

A couple of years ago I assisted an effects company on a commercial with a snow drop, so here is what I remember. We had two kinds of snow available.

The first type was bales of 'flakey paper' which is available in different thicknesses. this was sprinkled over the floor to create a covering of snow. It can also be used with a blower to create a snowfall. The blower also had a hose attachment so that a surface could be dampened and then snow blown/dropped onto it so that it stuck (we used it for a garden fence)

The second type was similar to a smoke machine in that you mix up some snow juice and pop it in the back of the machine and it blows out snow and there is a dial to adjust amount of snow and different fittings for flake-size, this kind soon turns back to liquid and won't settle for long.

And as Tim Tyler points out it is a pain to clear up afterwards...

check out Snow Business

Now to think of something ambiguous for my second post.

Edited by Noel, 20 July 2005 - 10:58 AM.

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#8 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 03:55 PM

I found what I'm talking about:

Snowcel Paper Snow : is very stable and weatherproof. More expensive than foam or C90, but cost effective when the set is used for more than a week, it is good for work on location in its chemical free form and for studio work in its class 1 fire resistant version. Full size paper snow is used for dressing and bulking up. Half size or other varieties applied over this create special effects or support extreme close up of camera.

Sounds pretty cool...

Edited by Landon D. Parks, 20 July 2005 - 03:59 PM.

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#9 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 04:03 PM

Hi,

I once got a quote to do a snow scene. Because it was a sensitive location (a historic building) we opted for a very finely divided paper product which washes away in the first rain. It's applied with a blower, and is fairly expensive.

Phil
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