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KODACHROME 40 in daylight


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#1 sophia olsson

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Posted 23 July 2005 - 08:10 AM

I´m going to shoot a shortfilm with KODACHROME 40 in daylight on Super 8 and I haven´t shot on Super 8 before so I have some questions.

Do I push in the "sun"-daylight-bottom and does that work as an 85 filter and is that why the exposure goes down to 25 ASA instead of 40 ASA?

Thank you :) !

Best regards,
/Lisa
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 July 2005 - 10:33 AM

I´m going to shoot a shortfilm with KODACHROME 40 in daylight on Super 8 and I haven´t shot on Super 8 before so I have some questions.

Do I push in the "sun"-daylight-bottom and does that work as an 85 filter and is that why the exposure goes down to 25 ASA instead of 40 ASA?

Thank you :) !

Best regards,
/Lisa

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Yes, the "key" or button for daylight (the "sun" symbol) slides an internal 85A filter behind the lens to correct 5500K to 3400K. The filter loses 2/3's of a stop, so 40 ASA becomes 25 ASA.
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#3 sophia olsson

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Posted 23 July 2005 - 10:51 AM

Thank you David!

Now I can feel safe about that when we start filming in a couple of days.

Best regards,
/Lisa
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 July 2005 - 11:43 AM

Thank you David!

Now I can feel safe about that when we start filming in a couple of days.

Best regards,
/Lisa

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I can't remember with the older cameras using a key if the key had to be in or out of the slot for daylight (i.e. to push the filter into place). People often lost that key.
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#5 sophia olsson

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Posted 23 July 2005 - 01:34 PM

Thank you, I´ll check that out! I have another question which is about filming on Super 8 with a Nizo (brown) 1 camera:

Do you know if I have to keep my eye close to the viewfinder when shooting to prevent light getting in on the film or is it safe even if the viewfinder isn´t covered (which I really hope, regarding the pictures we would like to shoot)?

Best regards,
/Lisa
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 July 2005 - 01:49 PM

I don't have a definitive answer. When I was in high school shooting Super-8, I wasn't too concerned about always keeping my eye to the viewfinder and didn't seem to have many problems with fogging, perhaps because most Super-8 cameras don't use a standard mirror shutter but some sort of beamsplitter, so it's harder for as much light to travel back through the viewfinder. However, my Super-8 camera also had a closed-viewfinder switch so obviously you were supposed to keep the viewfinder covered. On my first 16mm project with an Arri-S, I was just as cavelier with keeping my eye tight to the viewfinder as with Super-8 and I did have fogging from light leaking, so lesson learned.

So my guess is that you should keep your eye to the viewfinder but that Super-8 viewfinders don't transmit as much light back to the film as a mirror reflex camera's viewfinder would.
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#7 sophia olsson

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Posted 23 July 2005 - 02:29 PM

Thanks once more, I´ll just keep my head tight to the viewfinder - to be on the safe side :) !

Best regards,
/Lisa
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#8 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 23 July 2005 - 02:41 PM

Thanks once more,  I´ll just keep my head tight to the viewfinder - to be on the safe side :) !

Best regards,
/Lisa

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Some super-8 cameras have a diopter switch that switches the viewfinder to black, so there must be reason. However, since Kodachrome is contrasty anyway, would a slight hit of viewfinder light actually reduce contrast just a bit?
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#9 morris milne

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Posted 23 July 2005 - 02:54 PM

Yes, the "key" or button for daylight (the "sun" symbol) slides an internal 85A filter behind the lens to correct 5500K to 3400K.  The filter loses 2/3's of a stop, so 40 ASA becomes 25 ASA.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Sorry to jump in on this thread... but does this mean when i am shooting with a Beaulieu 4008zm11 with K40 in Daylight... do i set the ASA on the camera to 25 and shoot WITHOUT the 85A filter... or do i set ASA to 40 and shoot WITH 85A filter ??

I normaly shoot ASA set to 40 with filter in... so maybe i already know the answer... but does it mean i can set for 25ASA with no filter and get the same results??
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#10 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 July 2005 - 07:36 PM

Sorry to jump in on this thread... but does this mean when i am shooting with a Beaulieu 4008zm11 with K40 in Daylight... do i set the ASA on the camera to 25 and shoot WITHOUT the 85A filter... or do i set ASA to 40 and shoot WITH 85A filter ??

I normaly shoot ASA set to 40 with filter in... so maybe i already know the answer... but does it mean i can set for 25ASA with no filter and get the same results??

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Depends on if the internal meter is reading through the filter, which is unlikely. If it were, you'd set the meter to 40 ASA. But if it weren't, you either set the meter to 25 ASA, or set it to 40 ASA and open-up 2/3's of a stop yourself to compensate for the 85A. Unless the camera had some sort of internal method of compensating for the filter.

It would be easy enough to check. Set the camera to 40 ASA with no filter in place, see what the meter tells you, switch in the filter and see if the meter changes its reading. If not, then you have to change the ASA input from 40 to 25 ASA.
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