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KODACHROME 40 and wrong exposure...


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#1 Line

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Posted 25 July 2005 - 05:04 AM

I have filmed a shortfilm with some friends for one day with KODACHROME 40 in daylight, but it was much darker than we thought it would be... Which means that the film is overall underexposed 1 step, but in the end it´s up to 2-3 steps ;) !

So now I´m going to send the cassettes to the lab and should I "push" (I don´t know how to say it in english) the film one step (+1) and some of the cassettes two steps (+2). I know that it won´t look good, but we want to see what it looks like. What happens if we develope it +2, is it stupid and to I crush the film to much or should I do that rather than not "pushing" the film at all?

Thank you for all advices!
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 25 July 2005 - 06:29 AM

So now I´m going to send the cassettes to the lab and should I "push" (I don´t know how to say it in english) the film one step (+1) and some of the cassettes two steps (+2). I know that it won´t look good, but we want to see what it looks like. What happens if we develope it +2, is it stupid and to I crush the film to much or should I do that rather than not "pushing" the film at all?

Thank you for all advices!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Hi,

You may have trouble finding a lab that will push Kodachrome.

Stephen
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#3 Line

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Posted 25 July 2005 - 07:39 AM

Oh no, that´s too bad!

I live in Sweden so in Europe I have to send the films to a lab in Switzerland and I just spoke to them and they don´t "push" Super 8...

Do you know of any other labs, for example in the USA, where I can see if they might "push" the film?

Thank you!
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#4 Bon Sawyer

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Posted 25 July 2005 - 08:03 AM

Dwayne's Photo can push and pull Kodachrome, according to their website.

-Bon
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#5 Sam Wells

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Posted 25 July 2005 - 10:23 AM

It's better to get the right exposure in the first place.

-Sam
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#6 Line

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Posted 25 July 2005 - 10:56 AM

No really? Oh well, sometimes you take risks like we did this time. But now I know!
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 25 July 2005 - 10:59 AM

You also can't get footage pushed after the fact, after it was processed and you saw that it was dark.

You should get your camera's light meter checked if it's underexposing by 2-3 stops!
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#8 Matt Pacini

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Posted 25 July 2005 - 01:12 PM

I konw it's too late now, but for you newbies out there, this is another sad story that highlights the fact that YOU NEED TO SHOOT TESTS TO MAKE SURE YOUR EQUIPMENT IS WORKING CORRECTLY.

MP
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#9 sophia olsson

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 05:29 AM

Yes, you´re right but we didn´t have the time to do any tests. This was a small project that got started within a week, just to try the Super 8, Kodachrome, and with two actors.

There was nothing wrong with the camera and it was one step too dark when we started shooting, but we decided to film anyhow and that we would push it one step afterwards. So the film is not processed yet. Then when I wanted to process it, Kodak in Europe didn´t push Kodachrome but Bon Sawyer mentioned a place that does that (which I haven´t found anywhere else yet) and that´s Dwayne's Photo. Thank you Bon! So we´ll probably send the cassettes there.
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#10 Bon Sawyer

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 11:45 AM

No worries! I hope it goes well.

-Bon
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#11 Sam Wells

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 12:39 PM

You didn't exactly make that clear in your first post.

-Sam
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#12 Matt Pacini

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 01:26 PM

If it's Kodachrome, and it's REALLY just one stop underexposed, it's probably going to turn out fine.
I've shot lots of K40 3/4 - 1 stop under and it looked great.

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#13 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 03:34 PM

If it's Kodachrome, and it's REALLY just one stop underexposed, it's probably going to turn out fine.
I've shot lots of K40 3/4 - 1 stop under and it looked great.

MP

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



I missed the part about how many different film cartridges you shot. But at this point I would say learning the most you can from what you have already shot is most important.

Dwaynes in Parson's Kansas will push or pull Kodachrome 40, I think there is an additional charge however.

It sure would be interesting to learn if pushing and getting more grain as a result is better than leaving it as is. Would you be willing to describe the shooting condition you were in so that others can agree that you indeed were underexposed as much as you say you were?

What camera did you use? What f-stop, frame rate, shutter angle, description of location, type of lighting used, was it close up, medium, or wide shots you shot. Color of the actors hair and wardrobe is also an important issue in deciding whether or how much to push your film, is the image backlit, and how did you actually meter your frame?

It'll be more accurate and informative if you give us more info to work with.
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#14 Line

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 05:22 PM

Yes of course. We shoot 10 film cartridges (if that means the same thing as reels in english? I'm not sure) from the same film stock at a framerate of 24 frames. We were out filming in the forest and I used a separate light meter. We got started later in the afternoon than planned so it had gotten a bit darker. The light meter showed 1.4. and the largest (don´t really know how you say it in english) f-stop on the camera we used (a Nizo Brown 801) is 1.8. So we decided to go ahead and shoot anyway and push it afterwards (which I now understand is a bit more complicated with Super 8 Kodachrome than I would have thought).

Most of the pictures are close ups and medium, only a few wide shots. We didn´t have any lights in the forest, so we only used white boards (and I really don´t know the correct word for that either in english). I would have liked to have the actors backlit and the wether forcast had said that it would be sunny, but it wasn´t. It was cloudy.

The actors clothing was mostly medium dark green except their shirts which were light blue. One actor had dark hair in a page (again, not sure of the word in english) and the other's haircut was very short and blond. We saved some pictures until last that weren´t so important (because it was getting darker) and those are the ones that are 2 steps underexposed?

We will get the films scanned in telecine, but it´s far from where we're at so we can't be there and I haven't used them before. Is there maybe something I can ask them to do in the scanning? When the film is edited, we are able to work with the lighting afterwards also (which is good, because there will be some work that has to be done!!!).

Thank you everybody for your help and advices :) !
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#15 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 05:44 PM

I apologize but I have two more questions. Do you think the 85 filter was in the film path when you shot? Some super-8 cameras have missing 85 filters so even if you had the camera set to the 85 setting do you know for sure that it was there?

What camera were you using and was the majority of the footage hand held or on a tripod?

I'm not sure those two questions have relevance to how much to push the film, I was just curious.

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Since you shot so much film you actually have several options.

One would be to process the first cartridge shot normally, and the last cartridge shot pushed one stop. Based on those results you probably will know what to do with the 8 cartridges in the middle.

I wonder if Dwaynes would be willing to do a "snip" test on each cartridge in which they snip off the first few feet only and process according to your spec, the theory being the rest of the cartridge will be similar so if the snip came back with a processing number you could then advise Dwaynes how to do the rest of that cartridge by studying the snip and then referencing the processing number that came with the snip test.

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Another option would be to process the fifth cartridge shot, push that one stop, and then based on that result decide what to do with the other 9 cartridges.
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#16 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 07:42 PM

Another option would be to process the fifth cartridge shot, push that one stop, and then based on that result decide what to do with the other 9 cartridges.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


That makes more sense than a snip test. Super-8 is so tiny that you'd lose a lot of possibly important footage by snipping some off because of the need for heads & tails in the processor.
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