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not enough light?sony dsr 570-wsp


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#1 paramour

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Posted 25 July 2005 - 06:43 AM

hello everyone,
I'm working with the camcorder from sony,called "dsr 570 wsp" and I have to create a movie for a club in germany.the problem I have is that I'm not getting a clear picture because of the bad light situation,only if I zoom direct towards details.
I allready tried the "gain"-function, but that makes the picture even worse...
the only way the camera is getting some light is when the iris is completly open,what unsharpens the filmed objects.
if anyone knows what to do or if Ishould use another camera,please tell me..
thanx for reading!!!
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#2 Tim J Durham

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Posted 25 July 2005 - 07:05 AM

hello everyone,
I'm working with the camcorder from sony,called "dsr 570 wsp" and I have to create a movie for a club in germany.the problem I have is that I'm not getting a clear picture because of the bad light situation,only if I zoom direct towards details.
I allready tried the "gain"-function, but that makes the picture even worse...
the only way the camera is getting some light is when the iris is completly open,what unsharpens the filmed objects.
if anyone knows what to do or if Ishould use another camera,please tell me..
thanx for reading!!!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


1) Check your filter wheel. This is a round dial and protrudes from the camera body just above where the lens connects. If you are shooting indoors under tungsten lights (incandescent) you should be in filter number 1. If you are outside in the daylight or shooting indoors with mostly daylight, you should be in filter number 3. If you are in filters 2 or 4, you have added a neutral density filter which is reducing the amount of light getting in. These two filters are for shooting outdoors in the sun, mostly.

2) Check your shutter speed, turn it off (1/50th in PAL) or slow it down.

3) If that doesn't help you, your only recourse is to add more light or use the gain.

Shooting in a club is problematic with any camera. It's dark and the effects lights are hard to get a reading from. Ask the manager to bring the house lights up some until you can make level. If the shoot is for his benefit, he should be willing to comply.
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#3 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 25 July 2005 - 08:27 AM

Just one thing to add.

When you say "the only way the camera is getting some light is when the iris is completly open,what unsharpens the filmed objects."

Did you pull focus ? Opening the iris reduces the depth of field, but where the focus is, the image should be just as sharp as it is (or very closely to what it is) at a closer aperture...

If you have a amount of light, good filter etc. you could set a + 3 dB or even a +6 dB gain without loosing so much quality...

Mind the gain level you use when you do use gain...
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 25 July 2005 - 11:05 AM

Assuming he knows what to do about gain, iris, shutter, filter wheel, etc. to control exposure, he may simply not have enough light to get a decent exposure. I don't think other video cameras would be much better for that - they are all of a similar sensitivity. If he could live without a zoom, he could use Zeiss DigiPrimes and get another stop or more of exposure.

He should make sure that the back-focus is correct because shooting wide-open will make it more obvious if it's out.
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#5 paramour

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Posted 25 July 2005 - 02:41 PM

thanx to all for the quick answers!!!
I turned the filter wheel to ,I'm not sure,but I think 5600K,what helped a lot,but I still had the problem, that objects that were closer to the camera were still unsharp. But after I've been switching a thousand times through the whole menu and nothing happened I found out that the macro-wheel was turned........
so I changed its position and the image is now sharp!!!!
now there's still sometimes the "low-light"-warning but I checked on the monitor and the picture is fine.
from now on the fun is getting started!!!
thanx again!!!
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#6 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 25 July 2005 - 03:53 PM

>"I turned the filter wheel to ,I'm not sure,but I think 5600K,what helped a lot

As Tim said, if you shoot in a club, you'd better turn it to the number "1" position (5600 should be the number "3") you will gain 2/3 of a stop... and will be much better even...
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#7 paramour

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Posted 25 July 2005 - 05:59 PM

I think it was on 1,but I wasn't sure,I tried all position and I've chosen the one with the best result.
thanx again
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#8 Manu Anand

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Posted 25 July 2005 - 06:16 PM

You said youve already tried the gain function....well in the 570 you can assign different values to your toggle gain switch's L M and H positions. So the setting they're on depends on the preference of the person who used the camera before you.

I dont know what settings your gain switches were assigned but as you said they were degrading the image a lot i presume they were 6dB and higher.
The L M and H settings on the GAIN toggle switch can be assigned different values in the cameras advanced menu. There you can assign values of 0dB 3dB and 6dB to your gain switches in case they were higher.

An increment of 3dB gains you half a stop.

Manu Anand
New Delhi(currently in Bombay)
DP

Edited by Manu Anand, 25 July 2005 - 06:18 PM.

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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 25 July 2005 - 06:19 PM

5600K filter position would add a filter, losing some light. The 3200K position is a clear filter.
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#10 Jonathan Bryant

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 06:38 PM

Sounds to me like he needs a light. I use a DSR500 and even with it rated f11 at 2000 lux you still need a light in dark places like a club. Try 6db gain with a light , that is just at the point where you get a little grain. If this is a doc and you can't use a light you may try renting a DSR390 though not widescreen does have a rating of f13 at 2000 lux which would give you a brighter pic before having to add a light just to get exposure.

Maybe though you should hire an experienced shooter to help you out. I bet there is someone from that area registered on this site.
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Aerial Filmworks

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