Jump to content


Photo

Bolex for S16 conversion as B camera


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Jason Banker

Jason Banker
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 55 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 25 July 2005 - 02:41 PM

Hi,

I would like to do some single frame timelapse stuff for a feature that I am working on. The Aaton LTR 54 is a great sync camera but I don't think it is able to do that type of work.

So I was thinking of purchasing a Bolex for S16 conversion. The problem is I would like to know if this whole prism/shutter issue substantially degrades the image quality to a level that it wouldn't make a good B camera for this purpose?

Are there any other solutions?

As a side question, if I did get a B camera that was just Regular 16 and cropped the frame for Super, could I intercut the footage if I shot the R16 with a stock that was half the speed of the S16 footage? or would it still look very different?

Thanks
  • 0

#2 Steven Budden

Steven Budden
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 347 posts
  • Other
  • San Francisco

Posted 25 July 2005 - 09:41 PM

Jason,

I know you can get fine images with a bolex... they were used on a number of professional quality films. (FYI... I just listed my super 16 SBM on ebay so it's there now).

I also know that if you do single frame shooting with a bolex, the exposure will change towards the end of the wind when the spring begins to run down, unless you use an external tobin (or other) time lapse motor. I've read that anyway. I haven't done time lapse first hand yet.

Tou should also check out the Revolution time lapse intervelometer because it looks pretty cool too and can do just about anything (so they say).

Steven
  • 0

#3 Sam Wells

Sam Wells
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1751 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 26 July 2005 - 12:32 PM

I think there is a motor controller that will let you do single frame with an LTR. Made in England ? Not sure, ask Nathan.

Bolex can be a workhorse for this. The Norris motor would be the best, I haven't used the Tobin (cheaper).

You can do it with the spring motor but it winds down. If you have to rewind it and you're not done with the sequence you should really have your camera tied town, and proceed gently !

Put the motor speed at 48 or higher for spring wound single frame - least mechanical governor resistance then. If the camera is in good shape the exposure "shouldn't" change then. But a precise motor is safer.

-Sam
  • 0

#4 Herb Montes

Herb Montes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 225 posts
  • Other
  • Gulf Coast of Texas

Posted 26 July 2005 - 08:19 PM

Bolexes are widely used for animation especially stop motion. This is my Rex5 with an older animation motor that was inexpensive. A Stevens model that functions well though I plan on replacing it with a more modern unit later.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Bolex images are rock steady and sharp especially if you use Switar primes on it. Mine came with Schneider lenses that are considered just as good as Switars though in these pictures I have a Sopelem compact zoom on the camera.
  • 0

#5 Steven Budden

Steven Budden
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 347 posts
  • Other
  • San Francisco

Posted 26 July 2005 - 11:03 PM

One more question... wouldn't keeping the spring wound for long periods an an animation set wear it out eventually?

Steven
  • 0

#6 Herb Montes

Herb Montes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 225 posts
  • Other
  • Gulf Coast of Texas

Posted 27 July 2005 - 06:58 AM

One more question... wouldn't keeping the spring wound for long periods an an animation set wear it out eventually?

Steven

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


It has been recommended not to store a clockwork camera with the spring wound up. I always keep my cameras unwound when I'm not using them. And animation, especially stop motion, takes a long time. One can shoot short sequences and backwind the film to remove from the camera when not shooting for a long period (one of the advantages of having a Bolex). Just remember to mark where the last frame was taken.
  • 0


FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

Glidecam

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

The Slider

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

CineTape

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery