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kino flo


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#1 Ckulakov

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 02:08 PM

I really need some basic explanation about the kino flos.

As I understand they use flourecent bulbs and produce soft lighting.

What I am confused about is the light output and how much light they create. One of the bulbs that it uses is 5,500 K and says it is 55 watts and is a flourecent bulb. What would be the light output compared to a 250 watt photoflood would it be the same and would there be less light? What do you usually use them for? The problem is that I am wondering if I would be able to use it with inoor daylight scenes and if there would be enough light to use it with daylight.

Edited by Ckulakov, 26 July 2005 - 02:09 PM.

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#2 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 03:21 PM

KinoFlo's are easy to rig and create a nice, somewhat flattering soft light when used up close. They also run cool and use less power than any equivalet tungsten unit and have rapid fall-off. They are especially handy to rig high and in difficult spaces - very good for toplight in existing, cramped settings.

Over the years they have become easily the most used lights in the film industry, replacing the redheads and the blondes as the number one lights. I've used them quite a lot and I do like them - I've just decided to have a little break from them for the time being, just to challenge myself a little:-)
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#3 Alvin Pingol

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 05:04 PM

The other major benefit of Kinos is that since they were developed for photographic use, their color rendering index is very high and output a full spectrum (I believe), as opposed to conventional flos that peak in the green area of the spectrum (but can be corrected with some CT MinusGreen/magenta) and may or may not output the full spectrum.
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#4 Brett B

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 05:06 PM

The other advantage is the color temp. can be changed so easily. Just switch the bulbs and there is no output loss. They are really great fixtures.
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#5 Ckulakov

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 05:10 PM

"What I am confused about is the light output and how much light they create."

Could you please answere this exact question:

"One of the bulbs that it uses is 5,500 K and says it is 55 watts and is a flourecent bulb. What would be the light output compared to a 250 watt photoflood would it be the same and would there be less light?"

thanks
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#6 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 06:22 PM

That's impossible to say since it depends on pattern, spread, quality, distance and so on. But as a (very) rough guide I'd say KinoFlo's follow the HMI rule - they output about 4 times more light than their wattage would suggest compared to a tungsten unit. I.e., a 55w is comparable to about 200W tungsten unit.

But you didn't hear it from me.
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#7 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 07:50 PM

Hi,

They're not very bright, though. Any soft light falls off, but when soft is the only option, as it is with a flo, it's very noticeable. A few feet - more than ten - away and they might as well not be on...

Phil
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#8 Daniel J. Ashley-Smith

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 08:17 PM

This is a bit random but I once saw a lighting setup for a news broadcast set and I think they had about 3 kino's in a triangular formation. One to the front/right of the news reader, one to the front/left, and one directly behind. So if you ever wanted to do that kinda stuff, kino's are the way to go.

(If that makes any sense, or is of any help atall...)

Edited by Daniel J. Ashley-Smith, 26 July 2005 - 08:18 PM.

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#9 Chris Cooke

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 01:30 AM

This is a bit random but I once saw a lighting setup for a news broadcast set and I think they had about 3 kino's in a triangular formation. One to the front/right of the news reader, one to the front/left, and one directly behind. So if you ever wanted to do that kinda stuff, kino's are the way to go.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Those would've been Kino's bigger Image 80's where the fall off is not quite so quick. But only because of the boost in output (and cost mind you) compared to most other kino's. Like Phil said, in most situations, the flo will have to be quite near the subject especially when using them for your key.
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#10 oscar jimenez

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 10:05 AM

I think that they are great units, specially the 4 bank ones, 10 bank are kind of bulky, They are great for interiors and to add some little fill for exteriors. They can be plugged everywhere, from a car lighter unit to a Computer power Strip. And you can mix bulbs to have some separation on talent from background, mixin 2 tungsten w / daylight bulbs is one of my favs.
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