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Just a questions from someone unexperienced


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#1 ClosetCraig

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 11:26 PM

I know next to nothing about super 8 film. I was rumaging around a place I found when I came across an old projector. I fixed it up and it is currently running. I of course now want something to play on it, so I thought I could buy a cheap camera off of ebay and some super8 film. Upon researching, I found that kodakchrome super 8 is being discontinued. Therefore I have concerns. would it be a waste of money to invest in this type of film making? Does anyone supply super8 accept kodak? What is the difference between super 8 and 16mm film? will a regular 8mm camera (which you can get for about 20$) work with super 8? I know kodak supplies 64T super 8 film also. is there a large difference? am I wasting time as well looking into this. If things work out, I am very exciting in starting this hobby. Thankyou very very much for taking the time to consider my questions. I need all the help I can get.
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#2 Nate Downes

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 08:22 AM

Let's answer your questions in order:

>would it be a waste of money to invest in this type of film making?

Not at all. it is a learning tool if nothing else, if you can make it work on Super8, 16mm and 35mm will be a cinch.

>Does anyone supply super8 accept kodak?

A few other companies do. Pro 8mm out of Burbank is the largest US supplier of non-Kodak stock.

>What is the difference between super 8 and 16mm film?

First main difference is size, the film in SUper8 is 8mm wide. Second difference is perforations, Super8's are smaller. Lastly, Super8 comes in easy to load cartridges, making loading a cinch by comparison to 16mm, which you need darkroom equipment to load in many cases.

>will a regular 8mm camera (which you can get for about 20$) work with super 8?

No, that requires Double 8mm film. Different film size and perforations. regular 8mm is actually 16mm film with double perforations, which is slit in processing down the middle to make 8mm. You expose the film one way, then flip it around to expose the other half.

> I know kodak supplies 64T super 8 film also. is there a large difference?

On the surface, a little. E64T is not as contrasty, but it is still a close match to K40. And while K40 is being discontinued, there still are several stocks still being made by Kodak: E64T, Plus-X, Tri-X, V2-200T, and V2-500T. Plus, several other firms have their own stocks, Fomapan and Orso/Svema for example.
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#3 John Hyde

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 11:20 AM

Since it sounds like you have a projector that you intend to use, Pro8mm is not the best choice for your film stock. They only specialize in converting "negative" films to super 8 (not intended for projection). In addition, they have issues with excessive prices, questionable quality and customer service that would make it difficult for a first timer such as yourself.

I think Kodak is still a good choice with far better quality and reversal films (made by them) for projection. You should be able to buy their film products from them without hassle. Or, if you want some experts to help walk you through using super 8, I recommend you get your film and processing at Spectra Film. They offer all the Kodak super 8 films with in-house processing and optional telecine. They are very knowledgeable and should be able to set you on the right path for very little money.

Contact them here: www.spectrafilmandvideo.com

Good Luck
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#4 ClosetCraig

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 10:46 PM

thanks so much for your help. I have one other silly question. HOw does one go about transfering super 8 to the internet after it is shot. and also, can super 8 be played on something besides a projector?
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 11:11 PM

You need to transfer it to video. For the internet, you'd then convert the video to something like a Quicktime movie file and provide a link to where you stored it.
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#6 Giles Perkins

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Posted 30 July 2005 - 12:43 PM

Craig,

check out www.onsuper8.org we've got resources for everything you need to know in one handy place, including info. on DIY telecine.

Regards

Giles P.
www.onsuper8.org
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