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Trussing and Rigging


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#1 Daniel J. Ashley-Smith

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 12:02 PM

One thing I've been wondering is how they attach the lights to the rig. I was thinking about building a lighting rig out of building scaffolding, purely because it's cheap, but, how could I attach the lights to it? What kind of "attachments" do these lights have?

Thanks for any help,
Dan.

Edited by Daniel J. Ashley-Smith, 27 July 2005 - 12:02 PM.

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#2 John Hall

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 12:11 PM

The Cardellini Clamp is designed for just such purposes.

Posted Image

Just make sure to use a saftey cable as well, especially if the light is overhead on a grid.

http://www.filmtools.../cardellini.htm
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 12:58 PM

Lights are generally either hung on pipes with pipe clamps or Cartellini (or other clamps like C-Clamps) that have the appropriate spud (baby or junior, depending on the light.) Usually a safety chain is looped through in case the light falls off. Or they are mounted on stands, and the stands are securely rigged to the platform of the scaffold.

Beware of nearby power lines. You don't have to touch them to create an arc between someone holding a metal object and a nearby line. Two people were killed on an "X-Files" set while on scaffold because there was an arc between a pipe (speed rail) one was carrying up the scaffold and a powerline over 10' away. Just two days ago, some Boy Scout leaders were killed setting up a tent under some power lines.

There are a lot of safety rules regarding using lights on scaffold.
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#4 timHealy

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 12:59 PM

when rigging to trusses and pipe there are an assortment of clamps that are used. The best ones are 2k and 1k pipe clamps. There are also chessborough type clamps that may be used. Some grips use aluminum speed rail for other smaller rigs, but they are not as strong as steel. You basically need to use the right material for what ever the job is and the weight of the lamp or rigs to be supported. In addition to cardellinis there are mafer and c clamps with channeled steel and a 1 or 2k stud or recepter. Stirrups are a terrific tool on a satge too. They are uses to rig froma truss or pipe that can be lowered no further. They hang like a pipe clamp and extend down into a set where a light with a pipe clamp can easily be added. In a big stage rig, with heavy lights, pipe clamps are the way to go. I would save the cardelinis and mafers for smallers units on smaller sets.


But if you have scaffolding you may not want to rig to the scaffold itself. You could easily build a work deck out a window and use lights on stands as normal. It gives you flexibilty during the shoot. Just make sure you use safety rails and plenty of sandbags or even grip chain to screw lights down to the deck.

Best

Tim

Edited by heel_e, 27 July 2005 - 01:02 PM.

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#5 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 02:20 PM

Hi,

I don't think anyone who lacks the relevant experience should be doing this sort of work, anyway. About the most advanced I'll dare to get is a goalpost off a couple of wind-ups. Any more than that I'll get someone in to do it.

And I don't think that anyone under the age of 18 should be doing it, ever. You won't get insurance.

Phil
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#6 Daniel J. Ashley-Smith

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 03:30 PM

Ah right ok cheers guys. I'm not going to be using any proper trussing or rigging, because I've seen the price list for that stuff and I don't like it.

Literally all I'm thinking of doing is using a hall, to build a small set made from plasterboard, building a scaffolding structure which will support itself on the ground, and rigging a few lights up. *Possibly* a perspects window with a green screen outside. (Although building the green screen is purely speculation. I'd love to do a green screen setup but I think building the window will be too hard)

All of this is just thinking ahead.

I don't think anyone who lacks the relevant experience should be doing this sort of work, anyway. About the most advanced I'll dare to get is a goal post off a couple of wind-ups. Any more than that I'll get someone in to do it.

And I don't think that anyone under the age of 18 should be doing it, ever. You won't get insurance.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Ahhh that's where trusty Dad comes in. Anyway I've been looking at the safety precautions for these things and I think I've got a good idea on how to keep the set safe.

For a start it will most likely be my Dad building the scaffold structure and the set, he's good at DIY stuff. I'll just paint and decorate it... But I'll watch closely so the next time I do it, I'll be able to do it myself.

Believe me I'm just as concerned about safety as every other film maker. I don't want to get sued for half a million, and plus I actually do give a damn about the safety of my cast and crew.

Mainly I'm just learning about lighting right now. I'm not actually going to do anything of this scale for some time yet.

I think I might ask my college if I can help out with the lighting they've got in there actually. They've got proper rigging and lights. Ok, they're not exactly film lights but it will give me a rough idea of how things are put together e.t.c.

This time, I'll learn about the subject BEFORE going ahead and doing it. I tend to bulls**t my way into everything I do. The first project I ever did, "God Calling Rachel", I gave them crap about me doing loads of films before e.t.c. I was a P.A, and I still managed to screw that up! (I have to learn that with certain tea, you DON'T put milk in it..... then again was 15 at the time I think)
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#7 Daniel J. Ashley-Smith

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 03:58 PM

Just another quick question, about fresnels. As far as I know, the meaning of fresnel basically just means that there is a glass lens which magnifys the light?

Not sure though.
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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 04:07 PM

If some of us sound a little like we're banging the safety drum here, it's because we just went through our union's safety certification program last fall which included scaffold (parallels) safety for general crew and scaffold construction for grips.
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#9 drew_town

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 04:18 PM

Just another quick question, about fresnels. As far as I know, the meaning of fresnel basically just means that there is a glass lens which magnifys the light?

Not sure though.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

The lens focuses the light, not magnifying it. At least that's my understanding.
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#10 Daniel J. Ashley-Smith

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 04:24 PM

The lens focuses the light, not magnifying it. At least that's my understanding.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I see, so more of a spot light as opposed to a dispersed fill light?
Thanks.
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#11 Luke Prendergast

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 05:55 PM

A fresnel lens is a pretty vicious way of shaping light, but it needs a lot less glass and is physically very robust. The glass-to-air angle of a lens is what determines focus, so cutting the profile up allows sharp angles without a fat curved front surface, while retaining the short focal length. Typically, theatrical fixtures are stepped on one side and flat on the other. Posted Image
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#12 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 06:35 PM

Hi,

Bear in mind if you put a window in a set, the last thing you actually want is anything in it. Just make a hole. Glass or perspex reflect things. None of the windows on the Star Trek sets had any glass in them unless there was a specific need for a reflection - just a starcloth hung outside.

Phil
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#13 Michael Morlan

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Posted 01 August 2005 - 07:45 PM

A great article on the history of the fresnel lens here:

http://www.lanternro...sc/freslens.htm
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Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam