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The Devil's Rejects


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#1 scribe

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Posted 28 July 2005 - 10:28 AM

Does anyone out there have any information on what stock and processing method(s) were used on this film. I saw it yesterday and was surprised by its Texas Chainsaw Massacre look.

With todays stocks, super16 generally looks a lot cleaner.

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#2 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 28 July 2005 - 08:22 PM

I doubt it was Super16... This was a (guess) $9-$11 million dollar movie, and I'm pretty sure most was shot in 35mm.

PS)

With todays stocks, super16 generally looks a lot cleaner.

What are you comparing Super16mm too? If your comparing it to 35mm, I can tell you that by nature when dealing with most newer stocks (16 or 35), 35 will be sharper. Thats because the frame is more than double the size of a 16mm frame, and maybe 3/4 bigger than Super16. So by nature, more grain particals can fit in the 35mm frame, herein creating more resolution by nature.

Or maybe I need to go back to school...

Edited by Landon D. Parks, 28 July 2005 - 08:26 PM.

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#3 Richard Boddington

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Posted 28 July 2005 - 09:33 PM

"I can tell you that by nature when dealing with most newer stocks (16 or 35), 35 will be sharper"

This is based on your vast experience shooting 16 and 35 Landon? :D

There is plenty of sharp looking 16mm out there, and lots of grainy 35mm.

Lens quality, lighting, & ASA, are all contributing factors. Not to mention DOP skill.

Technically you are right 5245 should always look sharper and less grainy than 7245, I say "should."

R,
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#4 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 28 July 2005 - 11:57 PM

This is based on your vast experience shooting 16 and 35 Landon?

Yes.... :blink: :o :unsure: ;)
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#5 scribe

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Posted 29 July 2005 - 03:00 PM

From what I've read, this film was shot on 16mm, I'm assuming super16. In viewing, it appeared grainier and less saturated that other blowups that I've seen. Most likely this was intentional, serving the grit of the story. I was just wondering if anyone had any knowledge of the technique used for the look as I haven't seen much written on the subject, other than them using a DI.

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#6 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 29 July 2005 - 06:50 PM

seeing as how house of 1000 corpses was shot in 35mm, why would they switch to a lower quality format when the budget has increased? It was probly shot on 35mm... as to the process, I dont know. I cant seem to find any technical info about it...
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#7 Mike Donis

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Posted 30 July 2005 - 10:16 PM

Every article I've read about it says the movie was shot on Super 16mm.
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#8 Boone Hudgins

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Posted 30 July 2005 - 10:43 PM

seeing as how house of 1000 corpses was shot in 35mm, why would they switch to a lower quality format when the budget has increased? It was probly shot on 35mm... as to the process, I dont know. I cant seem to find any technical info about it...

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


They probably wanted to.
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#9 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 30 July 2005 - 11:14 PM

I cant fnd any articals on it,, please share some...
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#10 Manu Anand

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Posted 31 July 2005 - 01:40 AM

I cant fnd any articals on it,, please share some...

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Landon here are the production notes on "The Devil's Rejects"

www.lionsgatepublicity.com/ epk/devilsrejects/docs/pro_notes.doc


Here is an excerpt

"Despite a bigger budget and more technical resources, Zombie was careful to avoid the glossy, refined look that characterizes most contemporary horror movies. ?One problem I have now in movies, compared to the 70's, is they just look too good,? he says. ?Real life is messy. As soon as it becomes too clean, then you know you?re watching a movie. It's not scary.?
Wanting a slightly more rough-hewn look for the film, Zombie chose to shoot THE DEVIL?S REJECTS on Super 16, a grainier film stock that runs on lighter, smaller cameras. This enabled him to shoot the movie almost entirely with a hand-held camera. ?There's a little steadicam and only one dolly shot in the whole movie,? says Zombie. ?Even when we put the camera on a tripod, we always put it on a bag so that it was a little shaky.?
THE DEVIL?S REJECTS, consequently, recalls the bleaker, more desolate palette of George Romero?s early films or the original THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE. ?When something bad was happening, I wanted it to be horrible to watch,? says the director. ?The motel scene is a good example. When we filmed it, everyone watching it on the monitors seemed upset. And the actors all seemed upset. That told me we were on the right track.?
Zombie is the sole architect of his musical image and was responsible for developing and designing all of the band?s products and stage shows. It comes as no surprise, then, that he is equally involved in every facet of his films, from production design to wardrobe and hair. ?I drive everyone nuts,? admits Zombie. ?I did drawings of every character before we even had a costume person. I knew what I wanted everything to look like. Everything matters to me. If one person's sideburns or belt buckle are wrong, it drives me nuts. It's all in the details. Especially with a movie like this, where you're trying to create a specific world. I?m always trying to find that tone where it?s interesting enough that you'd want to look at it, but it?s never over the top.?
THE DEVIL?S REJECTS was shot entirely on location in the desert communities of Lancaster and Palmdale, California, during some of the hottest months of the summer. If the locations weren?t always conducive to film production, they contributed an air of authenticity to the rural, backwater look of the film. ?The motel set was tight, cramped, hot, and miserable to be in,? remembers Zombie. ?And after a while you could really see that the actors looked miserable. It was really uncomfortable to be there. Same with the desert. But it added an element of realism that wouldn't be there if it was a cushy, fake set. I think it also helped keep people in character.?
?Every scene feels much more real when it?s so hot and you?re physically in pain,? admits Haig.
Despite the discomforts the cast and crew may have experienced, Zombie fostered a collaborative atmosphere on set. ?It?s always a pleasure working with Rob,? says Haig. ?He?s relaxed. He?s clear about what he?s looking for. And he gets out of the way and lets you do your work. He instinctively knows your level of insanity and isn?t afraid to let you explore it, either.?"


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#11 drew_town

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Posted 31 July 2005 - 07:32 AM

Sounds like a wonderful production to be a part of. Incredibly hot and restricted, little creative input, and lastly the director looks to make sure his crew is sickened by the material. COUNT ME IN.......................
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#12 Nate Downes

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Posted 31 July 2005 - 01:23 PM

I'm with you Drew. Hey Rob, sign me up for your next film!

Then again, I know what he's talking about when it comes to these new holly-thrillers being too slick. I actually am debating between plain 16mm and Super8 for one thriller idea, due to the grittiness I want.
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#13 drew_town

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Posted 31 July 2005 - 01:26 PM

I know what he's talking about when it comes to these new holly-thrillers being too slick.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I think that's called the "Pearl Harbor" syndrome.
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#14 Nate Downes

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Posted 31 July 2005 - 01:42 PM

I think that's called the "Pearl Harbor" syndrome.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Well, I have one script I've optioned that would be ideal for shooting on 65mm, the grander-than-life epic. But, for the thriller I've been developing, it demands grit, and lots of it.

Too many cases of directors trying to force the movie to fit the medium, and not picking the medium to fit the movie.
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#15 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 31 July 2005 - 04:22 PM

Too many cases of directors trying to force the movie to fit the medium, and not picking the medium to fit the movie.

This may the the case sometimes, but let me tell you, a majority of the time its the producer or production company that will have the final word, and Super 16 is a gamble, while it may fit some films, people associate it with "Amatures" and the studios know this, so they may not be willing to allow the project to shoot in super 16.

Clearly Lions Gate don't care, and anyone who would make a sequal to "House of 1000 corpses" (that by the way got an D- on Yahoo movies and was dished by everyone around) can't care about much...

Maybe I should approach Lions Gate with my project! Cause if they will let Mr. Zombie direct or to even make a sequal to such a mvie as "House of 1000 corpses" then my project is sure hit for them!!!

It looks like it MAY have paid off though, but it will take it some time to make any money for the studio, seeing as how opening weekend was pretty sucky (6million I think), but it got semi-good ratings this time around...
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#16 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 31 July 2005 - 04:44 PM

I've heard of studios not allowing someone to shoot a feature in Super-16 ("Man on Fire" was one example); sometimes the reason given is the requirement to "deliver a 35mm negative" although if you create a 35mm internegative from the Super-16 original, especially with a D.I., I don't see why that requirement isn't met.
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#17 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 31 July 2005 - 05:23 PM

speaking of man on fire, I just rented that 2 days ago at blockbuster! Pretty good little movie, but like most films she's in, it wouldn't been half as good without Dakota Fanning.... She plays the role so well, as like most other roles she plays.
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#18 Nate Downes

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Posted 31 July 2005 - 08:15 PM

I've heard of studios not allowing someone to shoot a feature in Super-16 ("Man on Fire" was one example); sometimes the reason given is the requirement to "deliver a 35mm negative" although if you create a 35mm internegative from the Super-16 original, especially with a D.I., I don't see why that requirement isn't met.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

What was Man on Fire shot on? My co-worker insists it was shot with a GL-2, I keep telling him to go sit on it.
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#19 Mike Panczenko

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Posted 31 July 2005 - 08:28 PM

Man on Fire was on Super 35mm if I remember right.
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#20 Nate Downes

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Posted 31 July 2005 - 08:59 PM

Man on Fire was on Super 35mm if I remember right.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


That's what I thought, but I can't find any production notes to prove it.

The same co-worker insists that Spike Lee's shot all of his movies on a Sony VX-1000.
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