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Double Super8 and this weekend


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#1 John Adolfi

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Posted 29 July 2005 - 02:05 PM

Man I'll tell you I'm still upset and the feeling is growing. This weekend did I shoot my vacation and my friends on video...no. I shot it on double super8, black and white and finished my first roll in this sub group of the super-8 family. I love film! There I said it. But when I process this I plan on projecting it for my same friends and family. All I can say is that "Kodak, you picked the wrong film stock to get rid of." I want to continue shooting super8 kodachrome and when shooting my family and friends, and then project it larger than life. What film am I now supposed to film with Kodak so I can project it? Ektachrome 125? Please keep kodachrome!!!! Two thumbs down for Kodak's decision otherwise.
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#2 John Adolfi

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Posted 30 July 2005 - 03:38 PM

Good news a received today from John Schwind. He said Kodachrome Double super-8 will not be axed.

Edited by John Adolfi, 30 July 2005 - 03:38 PM.

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#3 A.Oliver

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Posted 30 July 2005 - 05:10 PM

But how long before Switzerland stops processing ds-8, 16mm and k64. What i cannot understand is why on earth kodak killed k25, i just cannot believe more people shoot 16mm k40 to warrant its existance, the stock has only just become available in ds-8 because of the k25 demise. So why not keep k25 in 35mm,16 and ds-8 and ditch k40???????
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#4 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 30 July 2005 - 06:06 PM

Man I'll tell you I'm still upset and the feeling is growing.  This weekend did I shoot my vacation and my friends on video...no.  I shot it on double super8, black and white and finished my first roll in this sub group of the super-8 family.  I love film!  There I said it.  But when I process this I plan on  projecting it for my same friends and family.  All I can say is that "Kodak, you picked the wrong film stock to get rid of."  I want to continue shooting super8 kodachrome and when shooting my family and friends, and  then project it larger than life. What film am I now supposed to film with Kodak so I can project it?  Ektachrome 125? Please keep kodachrome!!!!  Two thumbs down for Kodak's decision otherwise.

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I wish Kodak had a "suspension" mode in addition to a discontinue mode. If ever a stock was rife for "suspension" rather than discontinuance, it would be Kodachrome 40 and 25.

Isn't there some way to do one run of Kodachrome evey year, then mothball the equipment until it's needed again?
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#5 John Adolfi

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Posted 30 July 2005 - 07:19 PM

But how long before Switzerland stops processing ds-8, 16mm and k64. What i cannot understand is why on earth kodak killed k25, i just cannot believe more people shoot 16mm k40 to warrant its existance, the stock has only just become available in ds-8 because of the k25 demise. So why not keep k25 in 35mm,16 and ds-8 and ditch k40???????

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I'll second that!
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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 01 August 2005 - 09:22 PM

I wish Kodak had a "suspension" mode  in addition to a discontinue mode.  If ever a stock was rife for "suspension" rather than discontinuance, it would be Kodachrome 40 and 25.

Isn't there some way to do one run of Kodachrome evey year, then mothball the equipment until it's needed again?

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It's not the equipment that is the issue with small production runs. It is the unique emulsions that are used in the formulation...if the emulsions and chemicals are not used in other products, it becomes impractical to make and keep such small quantities for an older product like K-40. They have a "shelf life", just like film, and so can't be stored indefinitely.
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#7 John Hyde

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Posted 01 August 2005 - 09:36 PM

It's not the equipment that is the issue with small production runs.  It is the unique emulsions that are used in the formulation...if the emulsions and chemicals are not used in other products, it becomes impractical to make and keep such small quantities for an older product like K-40.  They have a "shelf life", just like film, and so can't be stored indefinitely.

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It's good to see you are still around John. I was worried about you not being around much since the big lay-off. ;)
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#8 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 01 August 2005 - 09:49 PM

It's good to see you are still around John.  I was worried about you not being around much since the big lay-off. ;)

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Kodak Entertainment Imaging (motion picture and television markets) is doing quite well and still investing in developing new FILM products, as well as hybrid and digital products. As for me, in July I traveled to Europe, had an elderly aunt die, and helped my daughter begin fixing up the 100-year old home she just purchased near Boston. I'm finally back in the office and catching up on the twenty or so user groups I participate in, not to mention the hundreds of notes in my in-basket.
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#9 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 01 August 2005 - 10:50 PM

It's good to see you are still around John.  I was worried about you not being around much since the big lay-off. ;)

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I was wondering also, glad you're back.

I appreciate the explanation for why products are discontinued. So when a product is discontinued, it's not the equipment that goes the discontinuance, it's the chemicals?

So if down the road someone wanted to order a really huge amount of Kodachrome, enough to where it would be worth it for Kodak to fill the order, there would not be an equipment issue caused by the dissassembly of one of a kind equipment?
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#10 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 02 August 2005 - 05:40 AM

I was wondering also, glad you're back.

I appreciate the explanation for why products are discontinued.  So when a product is discontinued, it's not the equipment that goes the discontinuance, it's the chemicals?

So if down the road someone wanted to order a really huge amount of Kodachrome, enough to where it would be worth it for Kodak to fill the order, there would not be an equipment issue caused by the dissassembly of one of a kind equipment?

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The support making machines, emulsion making equipment, emulsion coating machines, slitters, and perforators are generally the same across the motion picture product line. But certain chemicals may become unavailable, or come under new environmental restrictions, and reformulating a small volume niche product is not always practical.
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#11 A.Oliver

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Posted 02 August 2005 - 01:23 PM

given your clever way with words John, does this really mean that k40 is doomed in the not to distant future????????????Andy
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#12 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 02 August 2005 - 10:11 PM

given your clever way with words John, does this really mean that k40 is doomed in the not to distant future????????????Andy

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Time will tell, I won't. ;)

But "doomed"?...Please, it's not the Apocalypse. :rolleyes:
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#13 John Adolfi

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 07:47 AM

Time will tell, I won't.  ;)

But "doomed"?...Please, it's not the Apocalypse.  :rolleyes:

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John about a year ago you mentioned something on the horizon regarding digital processing advancing the image quality of film so that super 8 could look 16mm and 16mm could look like 35mm and so on. Could you elaborate on this?
Thanks.
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#14 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 08:12 AM

John about a year ago you mentioned something on the horizon regarding digital processing advancing the image quality of film so that super 8 could look 16mm and 16mm could look like 35mm and so on. Could you elaborate on this?
Thanks.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I don't recall the discussion being specific to Super-8. But Kodak image scientist Roger Morton and his team published several papers regarding the use of digital image processing to enhance scanned film images well beyond today's degraining and sharpening techniques. Lots going on at Kodak to develop such advanced Image Science for a variety of applications. B)
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