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Vision 200T


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#1 Carl Weston

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Posted 30 July 2005 - 01:16 PM

I?m planning on shooting a short film using vision 200 and was just wondering if anyone had an opinion on this film stock. I will be transferring this film to video.

Thanks for any help

Carl

Edited by carl Weston, 30 July 2005 - 01:17 PM.

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#2 Carl Weston

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Posted 01 August 2005 - 08:50 PM

I see Vision 200 isn't a very popular film stock in this in this part of town...
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#3 John Hyde

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Posted 01 August 2005 - 09:53 PM

I see Vision 200 isn't a very popular film stock in this in this part of town...

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I have had excellent results with the Vision 2 200ASA made by Kodak processed at Spectra Film in North Hollywood. It is probably the best multi purpose super 8 film available with low level of grain.

I usually shoot with a Canon 1014XLS. My results are nearly as good as 16mm. The latitude has really been helpful in pulling out a consistent looking picture. Excellent for both interiors and exteriors.

Be sure you buy Kodak brand stock, shoot with a good camera, get good exposures, and process/telecine at a good lab. If you disregard any of the points above, the quality drop will be significant.
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#4 Nate Downes

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Posted 01 August 2005 - 10:27 PM

Since Vision 2 200T came out, Vision 200T has been pretty much collecting dust. I've used both, and V2 just blows V out of the water.
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#5 Carl Weston

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Posted 01 August 2005 - 10:43 PM

I have had excellent results with the Vision 2  200ASA made by Kodak processed at Spectra Film in North Hollywood.  It is probably the best multi purpose super 8 film available with low level of grain.

I usually shoot with a Canon 1014XLS.  My results are nearly as good as 16mm.  The latitude has really been helpful in pulling out a consistent looking picture.  Excellent for both interiors and exteriors.

Be sure you buy Kodak brand stock, shoot with a good camera, get good exposures, and process/telecine at a good lab.  If you disregard any of the points above, the quality drop will be significant.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

thanks for the info....i wish I had a canon 1014xls..but I'm shooting with a Nizo S 80..I'll shoot a few test roll before I start shooting...
thanks again
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#6 Gareth Munden

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Posted 02 August 2005 - 02:49 AM

I have had excellent results with the Vision 2  200ASA made by Kodak processed at Spectra Film in North Hollywood.  It is probably the best multi purpose super 8 film available with low level of grain.

I usually shoot with a Canon 1014XLS.  My results are nearly as good as 16mm.  The latitude has really been helpful in pulling out a consistent looking picture.  Excellent for both interiors and exteriors.

Be sure you buy Kodak brand stock, shoot with a good camera, get good exposures, and process/telecine at a good lab.  If you disregard any of the points above, the quality drop will be significant.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Cool , Can you post a screen grab from your stuff John I'd love to see it .
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#7 Matt Pacini

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Posted 02 August 2005 - 02:58 PM

Waaaaaaaaaay too grainy for my taste.

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#8 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 02 August 2005 - 10:25 PM

Waaaaaaaaaay too grainy for my taste.

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Try a bit of overexposure to reduce the graininess. It keeps the shadow information off the larger "fast" silver halide grains, and moves the midtones to the fine-grained "slow" emulsions.
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#9 Mike Crane

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Posted 03 August 2005 - 12:36 AM

Try a bit of overexposure to reduce the graininess.  It keeps the shadow information off the larger "fast" silver halide grains, and moves the midtones to the fine-grained "slow" emulsions.

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I still like the 200 Vision 2 made by Kodak. It is a great stock for my lit interiors. But, it has its limitations as a good exterior stock capable of consistently delivering low grain pictures. It just does not function as well as the 50D outside.

I hate to say this, but I am forced to buy 50D from the other guys (who shall remain nameless). Their film and processing quality is marginal at best. But I really need the 50D to make some of my shoots work.

I wish Kodak would produce the 50D so I could buy all my film from them and shoot film more often for my low budget projects.
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